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Facebook Brings New Measures to Tighten Noose Around Fake Accounts

Last week, Facebook deleted 32 Pages and accounts from its platform and Instagram for being "involved in coordinated inauthentic behavior"

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Facebook, video chat
LinkedIn faced probe for Facebook ads targeting 18 mn non-members. Pixabay

The world’s largest social media network Facebook on Friday took measures to make it more difficult to run fake or compromised accounts on its platform as it demanded authorization from its users who have a large number of followers in the US.

“Today we’re introducing Page publishing authorization starting with people that manage a Page with a large audience in the US,” Facebook said.

People who manage these Pages will be required to complete an authorization process in order to continue to post, making it harder for people to administer a Page using a fake or compromised account, said the California-based social media company.

The new measures will ask administrators of Facebook pages to secure their account with two-factor authentication and confirm their primary home location.

Facebook
Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

Facebook said people will see more details in the Info and Ads section of Pages after a new section is added to show the primary country locations where those Pages are managed from.

Facebook said the requirement will be enforced soon this month, which will be applied to other Facebook platforms such as Instagram in the next few weeks.

The new measures are part of Facebook’s recent campaigns to prevent organizations and individuals from creating accounts that mislead its users before the US mid-term elections are going to take place in November.

Also Read: Blue Light From Smartphones Accelerates Blindness

Last week, Facebook deleted 32 Pages and accounts from its platform and Instagram for being “involved in coordinated inauthentic behavior”.

It said its security unit has found a coordinated campaign on its platform aiming to exert political influence ahead of the November US elections. (IANS)

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Social Networking Giant Facebook Interested in Blockchain-based Authentication, Says Mark Zuckerberg

According to The Verge, the risk of further data-sharing scandals is one of the main reasons why Facebook is wary of implementing the change

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Facebook
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA

You may soon login to Facebook with Blockchain-based authentication, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has indicated.

In a public interview with Harvard Law professor Jonathan Zittrain late on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said he is “potentially interested” in putting the Facebook login on the Blockchain technology.

“I’m thinking about going back to decentralised or Blockchain authentication. Although I haven’t figured out a way to make this work out but this is around authentication and basically granting access to your information and to different services,” Mark Zuckerberg told Zittrain.

According to him, Blockchain could give users more powers when granting data access to third-party apps.

Facebook last year promoted one of its senior engineers Evan Cheng as the Director of Engineering at its recently launched Blockchain division.

Earlier in May, Facebook set up a group within the company to explore Blockchain technology and its potential use for the platform, headed by Messenger chief David Marcus.

Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce and Judiciary committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. VOA

Media reports also said Facebook was exploring to develop its own cryptocurrency.

Facebook has over 2.3 billion users globally and launching cryptocurrency will allow them make payments using a virtual currency like Bitcoin.

In a statement, Facebook said: “Like many other companies, Facebook is exploring ways to leverage the power of Blockchain technology”.

Also Read- Whatsapp Security Bug Allows iPhone Users Bypass Security Controls

According to The Verge, the risk of further data-sharing scandals is one of the main reasons why Facebook is wary of implementing the change.

“You basically take your information, you store it on some decentralised system and you have the choice of whether to log in different places and you’re not going through an intermediary. There’s a lot of things that I think would be quite attractive about that,” said Mark Zuckerberg. (IANS)