Friday March 22, 2019
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Novel Detection Technology by Facebook To Curb Revenge Porn

A specially-trained member of Facebook's Community Operations team will review the content found by its technology

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

To deal with the problem of non-consensual intimate images, often referred to as revenge porn, on its platform, Facebook on Friday announced new detection technology and an online support hub to help people respond when this abuse occurs.

Called “Not Without My Consent,” the resource hub will help victims find organisations and resources to support them, including steps they can take to remove the content from Facebook and prevent it from being shared further, Antigone Davis, Facebook’s Global Head of Safety, said in a statement.

“We’re also going to make it easier and more intuitive for victims to report when their intimate images were shared on Facebook,” Davis said.

Facebook said it will also build a victim support toolkit to give people around the world more information with locally and culturally relevant support.

picture from- abc27.com

“By using machine learning and artificial intelligence, we can now proactively detect near nude images or videos that are shared without permission on Facebook and Instagram,” Davis said.

“This means we can find this content before anyone reports it, which is important for two reasons: often victims are afraid of retribution so they are reluctant to report the content themselves or are unaware the content has been shared,” he added.

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A specially-trained member of Facebook’s Community Operations team will review the content found by its technology.

“If the image or video violates our Community Standards, we will remove it, and in most cases we will also disable an account for sharing intimate content without permission,” Davis added. (IANS)

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Social Networking Giant Facebook Stored Users’ Passwords in ‘Readable’ Form

Facebook Lite is a version of Facebook, predominantly used by people in regions with lower connectivity

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Facebook on Thursday said it has fixed a security issue wherein millions of its users’ passwords were stored in plain text and “readable” format for years and according to reports, were searchable by thousands of its employees.

The report by KrebsOnSecurity claimed on Thursday around 200-600 million Facebook users may have had their account passwords stored in plain text and searchable by over 20,000 Facebook employees.

In a blog post later, Facebook said as part of a routine security review in January, it found that some user passwords were being stored in a readable format within our internal data storage systems.

“This caught our attention because our login systems are designed to mask passwords using techniques that make them unreadable.

“We have fixed these issues and as a precaution will be notifying everyone whose passwords we found stored this way,” wrote Pedro Canahuati, VP Engineering, Security and Privacy at Facebook.

The company, however, said these passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook.

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A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

“We have found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed them. We estimate that we will notify this to hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users, tens of millions of other Facebook users, and tens of thousands of Instagram users.

Facebook Lite is a version of Facebook, predominantly used by people in regions with lower connectivity.

“Out of an abundance of caution, we are telling people so that they can change passwords if they choose,” Facebook tweeted.

Also Read- EU Fines Google $1.7 bn for Unfair Online Ad Rules

Earlier this month, Facebook came under scrutiny for using phone numbers provided for security reasons — like two-factor authentication (2FA) — for things like advertising and making users searchable by their phone numbers across its different platforms.

“Consider enabling a security key or two-factor authentication to protect your Facebook account using codes from a third party authentication app. When you log in with your password, we will ask for a security code or to tap your security key to verify that it is you,” Facebook advised. (IANS)