Monday January 21, 2019
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Facebook Announces its First Data Centre in Singapore

The 11-storey facility will be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy, Facebook added

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Facebook testing 'LOL' app to woo kids, experts wary. Pixabay

As governments the world over including in India aim to store data of their people within their boundaries, Facebook on Friday announced to build its first data centre in Asia that will be located in Singapore.

The 170,000-square-metre data centre will be built with more than 1.4 billion Singapore dollars (over $1 billion), opening hundreds of job opportunities.

“We are excited to announce that Facebook’s first custom-built data center in Asia will be located in Singapore. It will support hundreds of jobs and form part of our growing presence in Singapore and across Asia,” Facebook said in a statement.

Facebook’s data centres are currently located across the US and in Europe.

In India, a government panel is currently working on the guidelines to ensure that data generated locally must be stored within the country.

The social media giant said it selected Singapore for robust infrastructure and access to fibre, a talented local workforce, and a great set of community partners, including the Singapore Economic Development Board.

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Facebook’s data centres are currently located across the US and in Europe. Pixabay

“Singapore has also established policies that foster a business-friendly environment, including measures that support the enforcement of contracts and increase the ease of construction permitting,” Facebook said.

The World Bank recently named Singapore as top country in Asia to do business.

The Singapore data centre will be the first to incorporate the new “StatePoint Liquid Cooling” system.

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This technology minimises water and power consumption and can reduce the amount of peak water used by 20 per cent in climates like Singapore’s, said Facebook.

The 11-storey facility will be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy, Facebook added. (IANS)

Next Story

Facebook Set to Launch a Petitions Feature For its Users

"There are some limits already: users can't tag President Donald Trump or Vice President Mike Pence," said another report in The Verge

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Facebook, data,photos
A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Facebook is set to launch a petitions feature called “Community Actions” that will let users request change from their local and national elected officials and government agencies.

According to a report in TechCrunch late Sunday, “Community Actions” will be a petition feature in Facebook’s News Feed and reach users in the US on Tuesday and other markets later.

“Users can add a title, description, and image to their ‘Community Action’, and tag relevant government agencies and officials who’ll be notified,” the report added.

Supporters for any given petition will be able to discuss the topic with fellow supporters, creating events and fundraisers.

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This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

However, the “Community Actions” feature could also provide “vocal interest groups a bully pulpit from which to pressure politicians and bureaucrats with their fringe agendas”.

According to a Facebook spokesperson, “Community Action” is another way for people to advocate for changes in their communities and partner with elected officials and government agencies on solutions.

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Since bad actors can misuse such features, Facebook will use “a combination of user flagging, proactive algorithmic detection, and human enforcers,” to safeguard the “Community Action” feature from falling into wrong hands.

“There are some limits already: users can’t tag President Donald Trump or Vice President Mike Pence,” said another report in The Verge. (IANS)