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Facebook Announces to Discontinue its ‘Moments’ App Soon

The social media giant first launched "Moments" in 2015 to allow users to share pictures with friends without having to upload them on Facebook

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Facebook has announced that it is discontinuing its stand-alone “Moments” photo saving and sharing app from February 25 owing to lack of users.

“We’re ending support for the Moments app but we know the photos people share are important to them so we will continue offering ways to save memories within the Facebook app,” CNET quoted Rushabh Doshi, Director of Product Management for “Moments”, as saying on Thursday.

Though the company declined to share user numbers, the reason behind the shutdown is because not a lot of people are using it

Accoding to Sensor Tower, a mobile analytics firm, the app has been installed by 87 million iOS and Android users since its launch and at its peak, was downloaded 10.7 million times in June 2016 that declined to about 150,000 downloads last month.

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This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

Facebook notified “Moment” users about its shutting down via emails and app alerts.

Since people need time to retrieve their photos from the app before it is killed, Facebook has set up a website, available till May, from where users can export their photos either to PCs or theie phone camera rolls.

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People can also upload their “Moments” photos to an album on Facebook’s main app. By default, the photos in those albums will be set so only you can see them, the report added.

The social media giant first launched “Moments” in 2015 to allow users to share pictures with friends without having to upload them on Facebook. (IANS)

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Experts Urging Users to Change their Facebook Passwords and Turn on Two-Factor Authentication

Facebook in a blog post on Thursday said that it had fixed the issue and will be notifying everyone whose passwords it found stored this way

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Facebook in a blog post on Thursday said that it had fixed the issue and will be notifying everyone whose passwords it found stored this way. Pixabay

After a report revealed around 200-600 million Facebook users may have had their account passwords stored in plain text and searchable by over 20,000 Facebook employees, cybersecurity experts are urging users to change their passwords and turn on the two-factor authentication (2FA).

So far the inquiry has uncovered archives with plain text user passwords dating back to 2012, according to the report published this week by KrebsOnSecurity, a blog run by journalist Brian Krebs.

Facebook in a blog post on Thursday said that it had fixed the issue and will be notifying everyone whose passwords it found stored this way.

“It’s perfectly possible that no passwords at all fell into the hands of any crooks as a result of this. But if any passwords did get into the wrong hands then you can expect them to be abused,” said Paul Ducklin, Senior Technologist at global cybersecurity firm Sophos.

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Facebook said it had found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed the passwords. Pixabay

“Hashed passwords still need to be cracked before they can be used; plaintext passwords are the real deal without any further hacking or cracking needed,” Ducklin added.

Facebook said it had found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed the passwords.

“While the details of the incident are still emerging, this is likely an accidental programming error that led to the logging of plain text credentials. That said, this should never have happened and Facebook needs to ensure that no user credentials or data were compromised as a result of this error,” said John Shier, Senior Security Advisor at Sophos.

“This is also another reminder for people who are still reusing passwords or using weak passwords to change their Facebook password to something strong and unique and to turn on two-factor authentication (2FA),” Shier said. Turning on 2FA would mean that a password alone is not enough for crooks to raid your account, Ducklin added.

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Turning on 2FA would mean that a password alone is not enough for crooks to raid your account, Ducklin added. Pixabay

Facebook also asked people to change their passwords “out of an abundance of caution”.

Earlier this month, Facebook came under scrutiny for using phone numbers provided for security reasons — like two-factor authentication (2FA) — for things like advertising and making users searchable by their phone numbers across its different platforms.

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“Another security measure users can implement to strengthen their digital security postures is to use different passwords for different online accounts. Don’t use your Facebook password for any other login, particularly for personal/professional email accounts or online banking,” said Sanjay Katkar, Joint Managing Director and Chief Technology Officer, Quick Heal Technologies Limited.

“It is also a good practice to log out whenever not using Facebook, even on mobile devices,” Katkar added. (IANS)