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Facebook Facing Criticism for banning Breast Cancer Non-profit’s Ads

Breast cancer survivors, however, criticised the social media giant’s decision to ban the campaign

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FILE - A man poses for a photo in front of a computer showing Facebook ad preferences in San Francisco, California, March 26, 2018. VOA

Facebook is facing criticism from breast cancer survivors after the social network banned an ad campaign run by an Australian breast cancer non-profit, citing nudity rules.

The campaign by Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) which featured topless photos of breast cancer survivors was “specifically designed to draw attention to the disease that affects more than 19,000 people every year”, according to BCNA.

The annual “Pink Bun” campaign was launched in partnership with Australian bakery chain Bakers Delight.

The ads, some of which feature postmastectomy scars, were designed “to raise awareness of the importance of support and highlight the far reaching effects of breast cancer”, BCNA said in a Facebook post.

“Every person pictured on the posters is a breast cancer survivor who has volunteered their time to be involved and share their story,” BCNA said.

Facebook in certain circumstances allows users to post pictures of breasts, but its policy for advertisers is much stricter, in part because the content is actively pushed to feeds rather than users having to opt in to see it, BuzzFeed News reported on Friday.

Facebook ads do not allow “nudity or implied nudity” and “excessive visible skin or cleavage, even if not explicitly sexual in nature”.

“We recognise the importance of ads about breast cancer education or teaching women how to examine their breasts and we allow these on our platforms,” Facebook Australia and New Zealand spokesperson Antonia Sanda told BuzzFeed News.

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FILE – The Facebook app icon is shown on an iPhone in New York. VOA

“However, these specific ads do not contain any of these messages, rather it is a brand selling a product,” Sanda added.

Breast cancer survivors, however, criticised the social media giant’s decision to ban the campaign.

“Disgusting that facebook would ban this (ad),” one user wrote in a Facebook comment.

“I am proud of my scars and it’s not nudity it is a reality for so many of us fighting for our lives and I will never be ashamed of them.”

“Hope Facebook lifts the ban – how ridiculous considering what else seems to be acceptable on this site,” said another user.

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“Should us breast cancer survivors be ashamed of our altered bodies? I think not,” another person commented.

“We are still women with beautiful bodies and this sort of campaign helps us to be proud of our bodies not just the fact that we lived.” (IANS)

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Facebook Loses its Place in Glassdoor’s ‘Best Places to Work’ List

The Top-100 list by Glassdoor is for large organisations or those with at least 1,000 employees. It bases its rankings on eight factors, including work/life balance, compensation and benefits and senior management, among others

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The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

Mired in several controversies amid break-up calls from the US lawmakers, Facebook has once again slipped off Glassdoor’s “Best Places to Work” list for a second year in a row.

Facebook dropped to 23rd best place to work, falling 16 spots from last year’s position, and its award score fell from a 4.5 to 4.4 out of a perfect 5, according to the annual listing by the leading job website.

The top three spots are occupied by leading growth platform HubSpot, management consultancy firm Bain & Company and market leader in electronic signatures DocuSign, respectively.

Among the tech companies, Google is at 11th spot, LinkedIn at 12th, Microsoft at 21st, Salesforce at 34th, VMware at 36th, Adobe at 39th, Cisco at 77th, Accenture at 83th and Apple at 84th (the Cupertino-based iPhone maker slipped 13 spots from the last year’s list).

Amazon once again failed to enter the list of 100.

For Facebook, 2019 has been bad on the diplomatic front. Several US Senators have called for breaking up the social network amid repeated data breaches and privacy violations on the platform.

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Facebook has failed to comply with the subpoenas for more information related to the ongoing privacy investigation into its alleged privacy violations and Cambridge Analytica, the media has reported. Pixabay

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Kamala Harris has stressed that authorities should take a serious look at breaking up Facebook as the social network platform is a “utility that has gone unregulated”.

Another Democratic 2020 candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren has also stressed upon the possibility of breaking up Facebook.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, however, rejected these calls, saying the size of the social media giant was actually a benefit to its users and the security of the democratic process.

Zuckerberg has promised his employees to “fight and win” if Democratic presidential hopeful Warren wins the 2020 election and moves forward with her stated plan to break up the big US tech firms.

Also Read: Here’s What India’s Privacy Bill Requires from Social Media Firms

The company in July agreed to pay record-breaking $5 billion to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) as fine for users’ privacy violations in the Cambridge Analytica data scandal involving millions of users.

The US FTC is also investigating Facebook for potential monopolistic practices.

The Top-100 list by Glassdoor is for large organisations or those with at least 1,000 employees. It bases its rankings on eight factors, including work/life balance, compensation and benefits and senior management, among others. (IANS)