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he novel coronavirus pandemic can wipe out more than $44 billion in global ad revenue for the tech giants Facebook and Google in 2020 as digital advertising runs dry. Pixabay

The novel coronavirus pandemic can wipe out more than $44 billion in global ad revenue for the tech giants Facebook and Google in 2020 as digital advertising runs dry, a new report has predicted.

According to global investment bank and financial services company Cowen & Co., Google’s total net revenue is projected to be about $127.5 billion — down $28.6 billion.


Facebook’s ad revenue for 2020 is forecast at $67.8 billion — a decrease of $15.7 billion, Variety reported on Thursday, quoting Cowen’s data. However, Facebook’s advertising business is projected to “bounce back” in 2021, growing 23 per cent (year-over-year) to $83 billion, said the Cowen analyst team.

“For full-year 2020, Google will generate $54.3 billion in operating income (43 per cent adjusted EBITDA margin) and Facebook will pull in $33.7 billion (49 per cent margin),” according to Cowen’s forecast.

In a separate blog post, LightShed analyst Rich Greenfield said that “digital platforms are feeling the pain soonest, given the relative ease of pulling ad spend versus mediums such as television (who are likely to experience far more pain in Q2 than Q1)”.


Facebook has admitted that its ad business has been adversely affected in countries severely hit by the novel coronavirus while non-business engagement like messaging has exploded which is affecting its services like Messenger and WhatsApp. Pixabay

Cowen has cut its full-year revenue forecast for Twitter by 18 per cent. “Amazon’s ad business, meanwhile, is ‘generally less exposed’ to the downturn than other large digital platforms because the company’s advertising is mostly related to product searches”.

Facebook has admitted that its ad business has been adversely affected in countries severely hit by the novel coronavirus while non-business engagement like messaging has exploded which is affecting its services like Messenger and WhatsApp.

“Our business is being adversely affected like so many others around the world. We don’t monetize many of the services where we’re seeing increased engagement, and we’ve seen a weakening in our ads business in countries taking aggressive actions to reduce the spread of COVID-19,” said Alex Schultz, VP of Analytics and Jay Parikh, VP of Engineering.

Also Read- Restaurant Owners in U.S. Face Severe Loss due to COVID-19

With one-fifth of the world’s population now under lockdown and industries shutting operations amid global supply chain issues, the new coronavirus pandemic is set to deliver a sharp and deep economic shock, a new report has said.

According to analysts at BlackRock Investment Institute, market moves are reminiscent of the darkest days of the financial crisis, but they don’t think this is a repeat of 2008. “Stringent containment and social distancing policies will bring economic activity to a near standstill, and lead to a sharp contraction in growth for the second quarter”, it said. (IANS)


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Elon Musk has renewed his promise to "extend life to Mars".

Following a huge growth in his personal fortune, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has renewed his promise to "extend life to Mars". According to The Star, Musk's wealth has swelled to an astonishing $230 billion. Or a whopping 861 billion Dodgecoin, a cryptocurrency backed by the entrepreneur after he was reported to have invested millions.

Musk is now richer than Bill Gates and Warren Buffett combined, both individuals who had previously held the rich list title. "Elon Musk (with a net worth equal to 861 billion #Dogecoin) is now richer than Bill Gates and Warren Buffett COMBINED!" popular crypto YouTuber Matt Wallace's tweeted.

To which Musk said: "Hopefully enough to extend life to Mars". "Have no doubt you will make it happen," Wallace responded. CEO investments, the creators of Dogecoin, also responded backing Musk's plans every step of the way. The SpaceX Mars programme was initiated by Musk to colonize Mars after he first conceptualized the project back in 2001. SpaceX's aspirational goal has been to land the first humans on Mars by 2024, but in October 2020 Musk named 2024 as the goal for an uncrewed mission. (IANS/ MBI)

Keywords: investments, combined, SpaceX, billion, Elon musk, tesla


Photo by Damir Spanic on Unsplash

A perfume is an essential part of dressing up.

By N. Lothungbeni Humtsoe

A perfume is an essential part of dressing up. Studies confirm that we feel more confident about ourselves if the final touches of our routine is a spritz of lingering perfume. However, how often do you feel that your perfume doesn't last long enough? How often do you feel that the fragrance disappears in a few hours? This is quite a common problem. Let's learn a few hacks to keep you smelling gorgeous all day.

Wearing your perfume right after the shower
Our skin tends to hold onto some moisture right after a shower. This moisture helps to lock the fragments that extend your perfume's longevity.

gray steel shower Our skin tends to hold onto some moisture right after a shower. | Photo by Chandler Cruttenden on Unsplash

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I'm nostalgic about Delhi. There's no ideal place to live in, where you are that is your home - Mukundan

By Vishnu Makhijani

Back in the 1960s, the national capital was a "quiet and safe place" where women were not harmed and you could sleep on your terrace "without locking the main house door". Then, "a nouveau riche class prospered" and outwardly, New Delhi today "is a beautiful city" but "beneath lies hunger, filth and diseases".Still, Malayalam author M. Mukundan is nostalgic about a city where he lived for 40 long years before moving back to his hometown of Mahe and this prompted him to write "Delhi - A Soliloquy", translated by Fathima E.V. and Nandakumar K (Westland/Eka) that has been shortlisted for the Rs 25 lakh JCB Prize for Literature, India's richest literary award. "When I was in Delhi, I felt nostalgic about Mahe. Now it is the other way round - I'm nostalgic about Delhi. There's no ideal place to live in, where you are that is your home," Mukundan, four of whose works have been adapted for the big screen, told IANS in an interview.

"In the early 60s when I arrived in Delhi, it was a quiet and safe place. There were villages within the city. After seeing a late night movie at the Race Course theatre, women and children would walk down to Lodhi Colony past midnight. No woman was harmed. "In summer, we used to sleep on the charpoys spread out on the terraces of our houses without locking the main house door down below. It was a city anybody will dream of living. And then Delhi changed all of a sudden - a brutal, grotesque change. "Factories and commercial establishments came up, attracting unemployed poor people from other states. Building mafias destroyed villages and fields and built ugly high-rise buildings. Poor people were pushed away to filthy slums where they led a wretched life of deprivation. Throwing away all values, a nouveau riche class prospered. Outwardly, Delhi is a beautiful city. But beneath lies hunger, filth and diseases," Mukundan elaborated.

Mukundan A Soliloquy" is the story of the changes and growth of the city with Sahadevan's life as the backdrop. Wikimedia Commons

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