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Facebook, Instagram, YouTube Set to Face Heavy Fines in UK for Harmful Content

Earlier this year, Facebook also received heavy backlash after video of the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosque in New Zealand was live-streamed

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Corporate, America, Climate Change
FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

Social networking giants Facebook, Instagram and YouTube are set to face heavy fines in Britain for failing to filter out harmful content on their platforms, the media reported.

As part of the government’s plan, Britain’s broadcasting watchdog Ofcom would be given new legal powers to monitor, investigate and fine social platforms for sharing or live-streaming “harmful” videos, including pornography, violence and child abuse, the Telegraph reported on Sunday.

With the new powers, the broadcast watchdog of the UK would be able to issue fines of 250,000 pounds (around $300,000) or an amount worth up to five per cent of the company’s revenue, if the sites fail to establish strict age verification checks and parental controls to safeguard kids from exposure to harmful videos.

If the tech giants fail to comply with enforcement measures, the Ofcom would have the authority to “suspend” or “restrict” the tech giants’ services in the UK, The Sun reported on Monday, citing the Telegraph.

facebook, instagram
Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. VOA

Reports about this new crackdown is seen as an interim measure and comes ahead of the UK government’s White Paper plans for a statutory duty of care to combat online harms, the report said.

Over the last couple of years, several cases of teen suicides, supposedly encouraged by provocative content or trolling on social networking platforms have come to light.

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Earlier this year, Facebook also received heavy backlash after video of the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosque in New Zealand was live-streamed.

Using “appropriate information gathering” powers, regulator ofcom may order sites like Facebook or Youtube to hand over data or algorithms which many say drive content to vulnerable children, the report added. (IANS)

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Posting Selfies Seen as People Being Insecure & Less Likeable

According to some researchers, people who post selfies are seen as insecure and less likeable by others

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Individuals who post a lot of selfies are almost uniformly viewed as less likeable, less successful, more insecure and less open to new experiences than individuals who share a greater number of posed photos taken by someone else. Pixabay

Even though selfies are popular, researchers say that those who post selfies are viewed as less likeable, less successful and more insecure. Published in the Journal of Research in Personality, the scientists conducted a novel experiment with hundreds of actual Instagram users to determine if there are certain types of self-image posts that cause others to make snap judgements about the user’s personality.

Their work shows that individuals who post a lot of selfies are almost uniformly viewed as less likeable, less successful, more insecure and less open to new experiences than individuals who share a greater number of posed photos taken by someone else.

“Even when two feeds had similar content, such as depictions of achievement or travel, feelings about the person who posted selfies were negative and feelings about the person who posted posies were positive,” said study lead author Chris Barry, professor at Washington State University.

“It shows there are certain visual cues, independent of context, that elicit either a positive or negative response on social media,” Barry said.

For the study, the research team analysed data from two groups of students. The first group, consisting of 30 undergraduates, were asked to complete a personality questionnaire and agreed to let the researchers use their 30 most recent Instagram posts for the experiment.

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For the study, the research team analysed data from two groups of students. Pixabay

The second group of students consisted of 119 undergraduates. This group was asked to rate the Instagram profiles of the first group on 13 attributes such as self-absorption, low self-esteem, extraversion and success, using only the images from those profiles.

The research team then analysed the data to determine if there were visual cues in the first group of students’ photos that elicited consistent personality ratings from the second group.

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It was also found that the students who posted more posies were viewed as being relatively higher in self-esteem, more adventurous, less lonely, more outgoing, more dependable, more successful and having the potential for being a good friend, while the reverse was true for students with a greater number of selfies on their feed.

Personality ratings for selfies with a physical appearance theme, such as flexing in the mirror, were particularly negative, the researchers found. (IANS)