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Facebook Introduces New Virtual Reality (VR) Headset “Oculus Quest”

Facebook announced VR headset called "Oculus Go" at a starting price of $199 in October last year

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Facebook unveils new VR headset 'Oculus Quest'. Pixabay
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has introduced a new virtual reality (VR) headset “Oculus Quest” that will be available from 2019, starting at $399 for a 64GB variant.

“The company’s first all-in-one VR system with six degrees of freedom lets you look around in any direction and walk through virtual space just as you would in the physical world,” the tech giant wrote in a blog post late on Wednesday.

The company has more than 50 games and experiences for “Oculus Quest”. The all-in-one VR system comes with “Touch” controllers, so the users can interact with people and objects in a natural way.

“Oculus Quest” includes the same optics as “Oculus Go” with a display resolution of 1600×1440 per eye, while incorporating a lens spacing adjustment to help maximise visual comfort.

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Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA

The company said it has also improved built-in audio for high-quality, immersive sound with deeper bass.

“With the introduction of ‘Oculus Quest’, we’ve completed our first generation of best-in-class VR headsets. ‘Oculus Go’ remains the easiest and most affordable way to get into VR, while ‘Oculus Rift’ leverages the power of your PC to push the limits of what’s possible,” Oculus wrote in a blogpost.

Also Read- Actors Jacqueline Fernandez And Kartik Aaryan to Endorse Spirits Brand

“Thanks to ‘Oculus Quest’, we’re now able to combine the best of both worlds and welcome even more people into the VR community,” the report added.

Facebook announced VR headset called “Oculus Go” at a starting price of $199 in October last year. (IANS)

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Twitter Gets Investigated By Ireland Over Data Collection

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages

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Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

 Twitter is reportedly facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system, the media reported.

Privacy regulators in Ireland have launched an investigation into exactly how much data Twitter collects from t.co, its URL-shortening system, The Verge reported late on Saturday.

The investigation stems from a request made by UK professor Michael Veale under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a comprehensive European privacy law under which EU citizens have a right to request any data collected on them from a given company.

Facebook, Twitter
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, left, accompanied by Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey are sworn in before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on ‘Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms’ on Capitol Hill. VOA

But when Veale made that request to Twitter, the company claimed it had no data from its link-shortening service. The professor was sceptical, and wrote to the relevant privacy regulator to see if Twitter was holding back some of his data.

Now, that investigation seems to be underway. The investigation, first reported by Fortune, is confirmed in a letter obtained by The Verge, sent to Veale by the office of the Irish Data Privacy Commissioner, the report said.

Initially designed as a way to save characters in the limited space of a tweet, link-shortening has also proved to be an effective tool at fighting malware and gathering rudimentary analytics.

Twitter
Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on foreign influence operations and their use of social media on Capitol Hill. VOA

Those analytics services can also present a significant privacy risk when used in private messages.

Also Read: Facebook Tackles Fake News, Deletes Almost 800 Accounts

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages, although no wrong-doing was conclusively established in either case. (IANS)

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