Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
FILE - The entrance sign to Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., Oct. 10, 2018. VOA

Europe’s top court on Monday said websites using Facebook “Like” button are liable for data as “Like” button plugins can transmit data back to Facebook even if they don’t click on those buttons.”

The operator of a website that features a Facebook ‘Like’ button can be a controller jointly with Facebook in respect of the collection and transmission to Facebook of the personal data of visitors to its website,” said the Court of Justice of European Union (ECJ) in its ruling.


The Luxembourg-based court looked into the case of “Fashion ID”, a German online clothing retailer, which embedded on its website the Facebook ‘Like’ button.

The consequence of embedding that button appears to be that when a visitor consults the website of Fashion ID, that visitor’s personal data are transmitted to Facebook Ireland.

“It seems that that transmission occurs without that visitor being aware of it and regardless of whether or not he or she is a member of the social network Facebook or has clicked on the ‘Like’ button,” said the ruling.


FILE – In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook’s developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

A German public-service association tasked with safeguarding the interests of consumers criticised “Fashion ID” for transmitting to Facebook Ireland personal data of visitors to its website, first, without their consent and, second, in breach of the duties to inform set out in the provisions relating to the protection of personal data.

The court held that “Fashion ID” cannot be considered to be a controller in respect of the operations involving data processing carried out by Facebook Ireland after those data have been transmitted to the latter.

“It seems, at the outset, impossible that Fashion ID determines the purposes and means of those operations. By contrast, Fashion ID can be considered to be a controller jointly with Facebook Ireland in respect of the operations involving the collection and disclosure by transmission to Facebook Ireland of the data at issue,” read the judgment.

Also Read: Panasonic Refreshes Mirrorless Camera Portfolio in India

Fashion ID’s embedding of the Facebook ‘Like’ button on its website allows it to optimise the publicity for its goods by making them more visible on the Facebook social network when a visitor to its website clicks on that button.

Facebook said in a statement that “We are carefully reviewing the court’s decision and will work closely with our partners to ensure they can continue to benefit from our social plugins and other business tools in full compliance with the law,” reports CNET. (IANS)


Popular

VOA

Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram logos are displayed in this illustration taken October 4, 2021.

Facebook says it plans to hire 10,000 workers in the European Union over the next five years to work on a new computing platform.

The company said in a blog post Sunday that those high-skilled workers will help build "the metaverse," a futuristic notion for connecting people online that encompasses augmented and virtual reality.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep reading... Show less