Thursday January 17, 2019
Home Lead Story Facebook migh...

Facebook might bring Stories on desktop

Facebook users will be able to upload photos or videos, or shoot them with their webcam to post from desktop

0
//
The man behind this development is Matt King.
The man behind this development is Matt King.
  • Facebook believes their stories can fetch the company money with correct advertising
  • They are trying to create and share stories through desktop
  • Users will be able record stories via their webcams

Although Facebook ‘Stories’ is not as popular as it is on Instagram and WhatsApp, the social media giant is convinced that the feature can fetch money through effective advertising and due to this, the company might soon launch it on desktop.

The company said that the narrative, ephemeral, camera-first format is the future of sharing… and advertising, Tech Crunch reported late on Thursday.

The report said that Facebook was doubling down on ‘Stories’ by testing the ability to create them from desktop and a much more prominent placement for viewing it atop the News Feed instead of in the sidebar.

Also Read : Meet the man behind Facebook’s successful ad business

Facebook is trying on many changes to increase the feasibility of their story feature. Pixabay
Facebook is trying on many changes to increase the feasibility of their story feature. Pixabay

“We are testing the option to create and share ‘Stories’ from Facebook on desktop and are also testing moving the Stories tray from the top right corner to above News Feed, just like on mobile,” a Facebook spokesperson was quoted as saying.

Previously users could only consume ‘Stories’ on web that had to be created on mobile.

Brands, Event promoters and Group admins who manage their Facebook presence from desktop might embrace ‘Stories’ more now that they can post from there, too, the report pointed out.

Facebook believes their stories can do great with better advertising.
Facebook believes their stories can do great with better advertising.

Also Read : Why Facebook blocking posts in India is necessary

Advertisers are likely to be more comfortable after getting Stories on desktop.

Moreover, a Digiday report said that Facebook was also building an augmented reality (AR) team in London to help it pitch sponsored AR filters to advertisers.

Facebook users will be able to upload photos or videos, or shoot them with their webcam to post from desktop. That could attract the monologue-style YouTube vloggers who have trained themselves to talk into their computer. IANS

Next Story

Facebook To Invest $300Mn In Local News Partnerships, Programs

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model."

0
Facebook, dating
Facebook owned photo-messaging app Instagram already supports the "Unsend" capability VOA

Facebook says it is investing $300 million over the next three years in local news programs, partnerships and other initiatives.

The money will go toward reporting grants for local newsrooms, expanding Facebook’s program to help local newsrooms with subscription business models and investing in nonprofits aimed at supporting local news.

The move comes at a difficult time for the news industry, which is facing falling profits and print readership. Facebook, like Google, has also been partly blamed for the ongoing decline in newspapers’ share of advertising dollars as people and advertisers have moved online.

Facebook, Fake News
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people’s feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

Campbell Brown, Facebook’s head of global news partnerships, acknowledges the company “can’t uninvent the internet,” but says it wants to work with publishers to help them succeed on and off the social network.

“The industry is going through a massive transition that has been underway for a long time,” she said. “None of us have quite figured out ultimately what the future of journalism is going to look like but we want to be part of helping find a solution.”

Facebook has increased its focus on local news in the past year after starting off 2018 with the announcement that it was generally de-emphasizing news stories and videos in people’s feeds on the social network in favor of posts from their friends.

At the same time, though, the company has been cautiously testing out ways to boost local news stories users are interested in and initiatives to support the broader industry. It launched a feature called “Today In” that shows people local news and information , including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements, expanding it to hundreds of cities around the U.S. and a few in Australia.

Facebook, social media
Silhouettes of laptop users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this illustration. VOA

The push to support local news comes as Facebook, which is based in Menlo Park, California, tries to shake off its reputation as a hotbed for misinformation and elections-meddling. The company says users have been asking to see more local content that is relevant to them, including news stories as well as community information such as road closings during a snowstorm.

The $300 million investment includes a $5 million grant to the nonprofit Pulitzer Center to launch “Bringing Stories Home,” a fund that will provide local U.S. newsrooms with reporting grants to support coverage of local issues. There’s also a $2 million investment in Report for America as part of a partnership aiming to place 1,000 journalists in local newsrooms across the country over the next five years.

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model. Facebook can’t be the only answer, the only solution — we don’t want the publisher to be dependent on Facebook.”

Also Read: Democratic Lawmakers Further Investigate Russia’s Involvement In U.S. Election

Fran Wills, CEO of the Local Media Consortium, which is receiving $1 million together with the Local Media Association to help their member newsrooms develop new revenue streams, said she is optimistic the investment will help.

“I think they are recognizing that trusted, credible content is of benefit not only to local publishers but to them,” she said. (VOA)