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Facebook Must Protect Children From Addictive Habits

Senior Facebook insiders admitted that some features in Facebook were designed to keep users hooked on the platform which may harm children and adolescents

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Facebook blocks more accounts for malicious activities. Pixabay
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Speaking of an “insidious grip” that social media activities may have on young people, a top health official in England has asked social media companies like Facebook to do more to protect children from addictive habits and dangerous content, The Telegraph reported.

“There is emerging evidence of a link between semi-addictive and manipulative online activities and mental health pressures on our teenagers and young people,” Chief Executive of National Health Service (NHS) Simon Stevens was quoted as saying.

“Parents are only too aware of the insidious grip that some of these activities can have on young people’s lives,” he added.

In order to deal with the fallout for an explosion of social media, NHS England which leads the national health services in the country is planning to ramp up its mental health services.

Facebook mobile app
Facebook mobile app. Pixabay

But Stevens pointed out that it is important to think about the prevention of mental health issues, and not just the cure, said the report on Sunday.

In a BBC Panorama programme last week, senior Facebook insiders admitted that some features in Facebook were designed to keep users hooked on the platform which may harm children and adolescents.

Also Read: Facebook’s Blockchain Division Has a New Director of Engineering

Facebook’s founding president, Sean Parker, earlier said the company was “exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology” and that the company set out to consume as much user time as possible. (IANS)

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Unable To Find The Source of Fake Accounts: Facebook

Sample images provided by Facebook showed posts on a wide range of issues.

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Lexi Sturdy, election war room lead, sits at her desk in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content on the platform, in Menlo Park, California. VOA

Facebook said Tuesday it had been unable to determine who was behind dozens of fake accounts it took down shortly before the 2018 U.S. midterm elections.

“Combined with our takedown last Monday, in total we have removed 36 Facebook accounts, 6 Pages, and 99 Instagram accounts for coordinated inauthentic behavior,” Nathaniel Gleicher, head of cybersecurity policy, wrote on the company’s blog.

At least one of the Instagram accounts had well over a million followers, according to Facebook.

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A man works in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content, in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

A website that said it represented the Russian state-sponsored Internet Research Agency claimed responsibility for the accounts last week, but Facebook said it did not have enough information to connect the agency that has been called a troll farm.

“As multiple independent experts have pointed out, trolls have an incentive to claim that their activities are more widespread and influential than may be the case,” Gleicher wrote.

Sample images provided by Facebook showed posts on a wide range of issues. Some advocated on behalf of social issues such as women’s rights and LGBT pride, while others appeared to be conservative users voicing support for President Donald Trump.

Also Read: The Year Of Women in U.S. Politics

The viewpoints on display potentially fall in line with a Russian tactic identified in other cases of falsified accounts. A recent analysis of millions of tweets by the Atlantic Council found that Russian trolls often pose as members on either side of contentious issues in order to maximize division in the United States. (VOA)