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Facebook Removes 3.2 Billion Fake Accounts

Facebook removes 3.2 billion fake accounts and 11.4 million hate speech posts

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Facebook kills 3.2bn fake accounts and11.4 million hate speech posts. Pixabay

As the US Presidential election approaches, Facebook said that it has removed more than 3.2 billion fake accounts in the April-September period along with taking action on 11.4 million hate speech posts in the same period.

In total, Facebook removed 5.4 billion fake accounts and 15.5 million hate speech posts since January.

“Over the past two quarters, we have improved our ability to detect and block attempts to create fake, abusive accounts. We can estimate that every day, we prevent millions of attempts to create fake accounts using these detection systems,” the social networking giant said on Wednesday.

The majority of such accounts were caught within minutes of registration, before they became a part of Facebook monthly active user (MAU) population.

“Our proactive rate remained above 99 per cent for both quarters. Prevalence for fake accounts continues to be estimated at approximately 5 per cent of our worldwide monthly active users (MAU) on Facebook,” said the company.

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In total, Facebook removed 5.4 billion fake accounts since January. Pixabay

Earlier this year, Facebook began allowing its hate speech algorithms to begin automatically removing content that violates its policies.

“One result of that decision has been a sharp spike in the amount of hate speech taken off Facebook,” said the company.

Facebook said It is using machine learning-based detection technology that can find and flag hate speech using several different methods.

Also Read- ‘Project Nightingale’ of Google Confronts a Federal Inquiry in the US

“Starting in Q2 2019, our systems began removing posts automatically when they received very high scores or matched existing hate speech in our database. In all other cases when our systems detect potential hate speech, they send the post to our review team to determine if it should be removed,” explained the company. (IANS)

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Private Firms Shouldn’t Censor Politicians, News: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook recently allowed US President Donald Trump's campaign office to post a fake ad about Democrat presidential hopeful Joe Biden on its platform

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FILE - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at a Facebook developer conference in San Jose, California, May 1, 2018. VOA

Defending Facebook’s policy of not removing political advertisements containing false information, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said that a private company should not be censoring politicians and news.

Challenged on CBS over the policy, Zuckerberg said “people should be able to judge for themselves the character of politicians”.

The policy has faced criticism from several quarters due to concerns that ads containing false information may spread misinformation and distort elections.

“What I believe is that in a democracy, it’s really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments,” the Facebook CEO was quoted as saying.

While demands for reconsidering the policy emanated even from within the organisation, Zuckerberg did not commit to any changes.

Mark Zuckerberg. (Wikimedia Commons)

While Twitter has banned all political ads, Google last month announced new restrictions on such ads.

The Internet search giant put new limits on political advertisers globally from micro-targeting users via election ads based on their political affiliation.

Also Read: LinkedIn Visualizes 20 Times Growth in Coming 10 Years in India

The main formats Google offers political advertisers are Search ads, YouTube ads and display ads. Under the new rules, political advertisers may target their ads only down to the postal code level.

Facebook recently allowed US President Donald Trump’s campaign office to post a fake ad about Democrat presidential hopeful Joe Biden on its platform. (IANS)