Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people's feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

After facing flak for briefly banning one of India’s most active Pages on Facebook that warned people about the dangers of fascism, the social media giant has restored the Page and apologised to its creator Dhruv Rathee.

A popular YouTuber with more than 1.7 million subscribers, Rathee on Monday pointed out that he was banned from posting on his Facebook Page after he wrote how Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party rose to power, which implicitly drew a parallel with the rise of right wing politics in India.


He highlighted in the post how Hitler remained unmarried, was more popular than the Nazi party, used propaganda and received support from industrialists.


A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

While the post was a criticism of fascism, and not an endorsement, Facebook first determined that it was against its Community Standards, drawing severe criticism from several public figures.

Facebook, however, later realised its mistake and restored the Page.

Also Read- Now Xiaomi Launches ‘Mi Pay’ for MIUI Users in India to Take on Paytm and Google Pay

“Account restored! Thanks for your support guys! See the second photo, the reason Facebook had banned me,” Rathee said in a post, while adding a note from Facebook in which the social media giant apologised for the mistake.

“It looks like we did a mistake and removed something you posted on Facebook that did not go against our Community Standards. We want to apologise and let you know that we have restored your content and removed any blocks on your account related to this incorrect action,” Facebook said in the note. (IANS)


Popular

wikimedia commons

Tenali Raman, courtier to Krishnadevaraya (A portrait)


Tenali Ramakrishna, or Tenali Raman as he is more popularly known is Birbal's equivalent in South India. A court jester and a scholar exuding great wisdom, Tenali Raman was known as one of the greatest courtiers in King Krishnadevaraya's court.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Pixabay

Battle at Lanka as mentioned in the Ramayana

It must be noted that different religions and societies in Southeast Asia have alternative narratives of Ramayana, one of the greatest epic.

Here are some of the versions of Ramayana!

Keep Reading Show less
Virendra Singh Gosain, Hindustan Times

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people

When a baby is born in an Indian household-they invite hijra to shower the newborn with their blessings for their blessings confer fertility, prosperity, and long life on the child. But when that child grows up we teach them to avert their eyes when a group of hijras passes by, we pass on the behaviour of treating hijras as lesser humans to our children. Whenever a child raises a question related to gender identity or sexuality they are shushed down. We're taught to believe that anything "deviant" and outside of traditional cis-heteronormativity is something to be ashamed of. This mentality raises anxious, scared queer adults who're ashamed of their own identity, and adults who bully people for "queer behaviour".

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people. They worship the Hindu goddess of chastity and fertility, Bahuchara Mata. Most hijras, but not all, choose to undergo a castration ceremony known as "nirvana" in which they remove their male genitalia as an offering to their goddess. The whole community is vibrant with hundreds of people with hundreds of ways of expression, the true identity of a hijra is complex and unique to each individual. In India, hijras prefer to refer to themselves as Kinner/Kinnar as it means the mythological beings who excel at singing and dancing.

Keep reading... Show less