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Social Networking Giant Facebook Set to Restrict Livestreaming Post NZ Attack

Facebook has also banned praise, support and representation of white nationalism and white separatism on its platform and Instagram

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Facing flak after the New Zealand terror attack that was livestreamed on its platform, the social media giant is now exploring restrictions on who can use its “Facebook Live” feature.

Facebook came under pressure after a white man livestreamed a terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch on Facebook Live.

The video of the terror attack in which 50 people were killed was viewed over 4,000 times before it was removed.

“We are exploring who can go Live depending on factors such as prior ‘Community Standard’ violations.

“We are also investing in research to build better technology to quickly identify edited versions of violent videos and images and prevent people from re-sharing these versions,” Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer (COO) at Facebook, said in a statement late Friday.

In the immediate aftermath, Facebook had taken down the terrorist’s Facebook and Instagram accounts, removed the video of the attack, and used Artificial Intelligence to find and prevent related videos from being posted.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on March 28 that Facebook needed to do a lot more to curb hate propaganda.

“We have heard feedback that we must do more — and we agree,” said Sandberg.

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FILE- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is seen during a keynote speech in San Jose, California, May 1, 2018. VOA

“In the wake of the terrorist attack, we are taking three steps: strengthening the rules for using Facebook Live; taking further steps to address hate on our platforms; and supporting the New Zealand community,” she added.

While the original New Zealand attack video was shared Live, the video spread mainly through people re-sharing it and re-editing it.

Facebook has identified more than 900 different videos showing portions of those horrifying 17 minutes.

“In the past week, we have also made changes to our review process to help us improve our response time to videos like this in the future,” the Facebook COO noted.

Also Read- Making AI Unbiased Has Become Essential For Human Freedom

Facebook has identified a range of hate groups in Australia and New Zealand, including the Lads Society, the United Patriots Front, the Antipodean Resistance, and National Front New Zealand.

“These groups will be banned from our services, and we will also remove praise and support of these groups when we become aware of it,” informed Sandberg.

Facebook has also banned praise, support and representation of white nationalism and white separatism on its platform and Instagram.

Facebook users searching for terms associated with white supremacy will be directed to Life After Hate, an organisation set up by former violent extremists, which provides crisis intervention, education, support groups and outreach. (IANS)

Next Story

Social Media Giant Facebook Sues Chinese Company Over Alleged ad Fraud

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks

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An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

Facebook has sued a Chinese company for allegedly tricking people into installing a malware, compromising peoples accounts and then using them to run deceptive ads.

Facebook blamed ILikeAd Media International Company Ltd. and two individuals associated with the company — Chen Xiao Cong and Huang Tao – for the fraud.

The defendants deceived people into installing malware available on the Internet. This malware then enabled the defendants to compromise people’s Facebook accounts and run deceptive ads promoting items such as counterfeit goods and diet pills, the social media giant said in a blog post.

The defendants sometimes used images of celebrities in their ads to entice people to click on them, a practice known as “celeb bait”, according to the lawsuit filed on Wednesday.

In some instances, the defendants also engaged in a practice known as cloaking, Facebook said.

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The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

“Through cloaking, the defendants deliberately disguised the true destination of the link in the ad by displaying one version of an ad’s landing page to Facebook’s systems and a different version to Facebook users,” said Facebook’s Jessica Romero, Director of Platform Enforcement and Litigation and Rob Leathern, Director of Product Management, Business Integrity.

Cloaking schemes are often sophisticated and well organised, making the individuals and organisations behind them difficult to identify and hold accountable.

Also Read: New Account of Twitter named @TwitterRetweets to Highlight Best Tweets

As a result, there have not been many legal actions of this kind.

“In this case, we have refunded victims whose accounts were used to run unauthorised ads and helped them to secure their accounts,” they wrote.

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks. (IANS)