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Experts Believe that Facebook Restrictions will Have Little Impact on Huawei

Huawei is intensively testing its own operating system, to be named "HongMeng OS" for China market or "Oak OS" for overseas market, which is likely to be launched in August or September

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FILE - The Facebook logo is seen on a shop window in Malaga, Spain, June 4, 2018. (VOA)

Chinese smartphone giant Huawei, which is currently battling the trade ban imposed by the US, has also been cut off by Facebook to comply with the sanctions, but experts believe that the move by the social networking giant would not have worrying implications on the smartphone player.

“Unlike Google, Facebook has taken a different approach to the US export ban. Facebook is suspending app preinstalls on Huawei smartphones out of the box,” said Prabhu Ram, Head, Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CyberMedia Research (CMR).

The Facebook move would ensure that all its apps, including Instagram and WhatsApp, would not come preinstalled on future Huawei smartphones.

“Consumers can still install apps via the Google Play Store,” he pointed out.

Echoing a similar view, Faisal Kawoosa, Chief Analyst at market research firm techARC, told IANS: “This is going to be least significant thing and will go unnoticed.

“In most of the cases, even if such apps are preloaded, they still connect to Play Store to fetch the latest build, as there is a lag between app being burnt pre-shipping and the date when a user starts using them.”

However, the overall impact of the US trade ban on Huawei is likely to affect the global smartphone shipments.

Singapore-based market research firm Canalys slashed its global smartphone shipments forecast by 3.1 per cent in the wake of the ban on Huawei.

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FILE – A man uses two smartphones at once outside a Huawei store in Beijing, May 20, 2019. VOA

Search engine giant Google has urged to be exempted from the export ban citing reasons that could be bad for its technology business.

Google also fears that the export ban would create a competitor to the US-made Operating Systems (OS), which would hurt the search engine giant’s Android monopoly.

Notably, Google announced last month it wanted to work with Huawei over the next 90 days, shortly after the trade restrictions were temporarily eased on the world’s second-largest smartphone manufacturer.

“Assuming that US and China are able to accomplish a level-playing field and trade understanding, including on Huawei, before the 90-day reprieve expires later this year, Huawei’s future will be bright. But if there is no US-China deal, it would mean that Huawei would have to continue full steam ahead on life beyond US tech,” Ram noted.

Also Read- Microsoft Decides to Establish AI Training Hub in US

Huawei is intensively testing its own operating system, to be named “HongMeng OS” for China market or “Oak OS” for overseas market, which is likely to be launched in August or September, China’s Global Times newspaper said on Friday, citing unnamed sources.

“Imagine, a new OS, and a new apps ecosystem. Gaining consumer acceptance in global markets. If, unlike ZTE, Huawei does not fail and fold, and is able to rebuild itself, it will signal that major American tech companies will lose out on the second largest handset maker’s smartphone base globally. It’s a tall order, but not improbable,” said Ram. (IANS)

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Social Media Giant Facebook Sues Chinese Company Over Alleged ad Fraud

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks

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An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

Facebook has sued a Chinese company for allegedly tricking people into installing a malware, compromising peoples accounts and then using them to run deceptive ads.

Facebook blamed ILikeAd Media International Company Ltd. and two individuals associated with the company — Chen Xiao Cong and Huang Tao – for the fraud.

The defendants deceived people into installing malware available on the Internet. This malware then enabled the defendants to compromise people’s Facebook accounts and run deceptive ads promoting items such as counterfeit goods and diet pills, the social media giant said in a blog post.

The defendants sometimes used images of celebrities in their ads to entice people to click on them, a practice known as “celeb bait”, according to the lawsuit filed on Wednesday.

In some instances, the defendants also engaged in a practice known as cloaking, Facebook said.

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The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

“Through cloaking, the defendants deliberately disguised the true destination of the link in the ad by displaying one version of an ad’s landing page to Facebook’s systems and a different version to Facebook users,” said Facebook’s Jessica Romero, Director of Platform Enforcement and Litigation and Rob Leathern, Director of Product Management, Business Integrity.

Cloaking schemes are often sophisticated and well organised, making the individuals and organisations behind them difficult to identify and hold accountable.

Also Read: New Account of Twitter named @TwitterRetweets to Highlight Best Tweets

As a result, there have not been many legal actions of this kind.

“In this case, we have refunded victims whose accounts were used to run unauthorised ads and helped them to secure their accounts,” they wrote.

According to a report in CNET, Facebook said it has paid more than $4 million in reimbursements to victims of these hacks. (IANS)