Monday October 21, 2019
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Experts Believe that Facebook Restrictions will Have Little Impact on Huawei

Huawei is intensively testing its own operating system, to be named "HongMeng OS" for China market or "Oak OS" for overseas market, which is likely to be launched in August or September

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FILE - The Facebook logo is seen on a shop window in Malaga, Spain, June 4, 2018. (VOA)

Chinese smartphone giant Huawei, which is currently battling the trade ban imposed by the US, has also been cut off by Facebook to comply with the sanctions, but experts believe that the move by the social networking giant would not have worrying implications on the smartphone player.

“Unlike Google, Facebook has taken a different approach to the US export ban. Facebook is suspending app preinstalls on Huawei smartphones out of the box,” said Prabhu Ram, Head, Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CyberMedia Research (CMR).

The Facebook move would ensure that all its apps, including Instagram and WhatsApp, would not come preinstalled on future Huawei smartphones.

“Consumers can still install apps via the Google Play Store,” he pointed out.

Echoing a similar view, Faisal Kawoosa, Chief Analyst at market research firm techARC, told IANS: “This is going to be least significant thing and will go unnoticed.

“In most of the cases, even if such apps are preloaded, they still connect to Play Store to fetch the latest build, as there is a lag between app being burnt pre-shipping and the date when a user starts using them.”

However, the overall impact of the US trade ban on Huawei is likely to affect the global smartphone shipments.

Singapore-based market research firm Canalys slashed its global smartphone shipments forecast by 3.1 per cent in the wake of the ban on Huawei.

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FILE – A man uses two smartphones at once outside a Huawei store in Beijing, May 20, 2019. VOA

Search engine giant Google has urged to be exempted from the export ban citing reasons that could be bad for its technology business.

Google also fears that the export ban would create a competitor to the US-made Operating Systems (OS), which would hurt the search engine giant’s Android monopoly.

Notably, Google announced last month it wanted to work with Huawei over the next 90 days, shortly after the trade restrictions were temporarily eased on the world’s second-largest smartphone manufacturer.

“Assuming that US and China are able to accomplish a level-playing field and trade understanding, including on Huawei, before the 90-day reprieve expires later this year, Huawei’s future will be bright. But if there is no US-China deal, it would mean that Huawei would have to continue full steam ahead on life beyond US tech,” Ram noted.

Also Read- Microsoft Decides to Establish AI Training Hub in US

Huawei is intensively testing its own operating system, to be named “HongMeng OS” for China market or “Oak OS” for overseas market, which is likely to be launched in August or September, China’s Global Times newspaper said on Friday, citing unnamed sources.

“Imagine, a new OS, and a new apps ecosystem. Gaining consumer acceptance in global markets. If, unlike ZTE, Huawei does not fail and fold, and is able to rebuild itself, it will signal that major American tech companies will lose out on the second largest handset maker’s smartphone base globally. It’s a tall order, but not improbable,” said Ram. (IANS)

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Facebook Ready to Launch a Dedicated News Tab on its Platform

Zuckerberg last week stressed that his platform has now become a 'Fifth Estate' in the world alongside traditional news media and people no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard

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FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

Calling itself a ‘Fifth Estate’, Facebook has reportedly entered into deals with prominent media houses to launch a dedicated news tab on its platform.

According to the Wall Street Journal, publications like News Corp, Dow Jones, New York Post, the Washington Post and others will help the social networking platform ramp up its ambition to become a news player.

“The New York Times has been in talks with Facebook, but a spokeswoman for the paper declined to comment on whether it had reached a deal,” the report said on Sunday.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spoke about a news section on its platform in April.

Also Read: Absence of Google Apps Hurting Huawei the Most

The section would reportedly be free for users, though Facebook might pay publishers whose work is featured.

Facebook is in talks with news publishers to offer as much as $3 million for the rights to publish content on its upcoming news tab.

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An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

“It’s important to me that we help people get trustworthy news and find solutions that help journalists around the world do their important work,” Zuckerberg wrote in a recent post.

Facebook could “potentially have a direct relationship with publishers to make sure that their content is available, if it is really a high-quality content”, he added.

Algorithms and human editors will decide what new content will appear for the users.AThere will be a breaking news section with 10 of the “top” stories of the moment.

Facebook has announced other initiatives to support journalists, including a pledge to invest $300 million in local newsrooms and grants for people with ideas to improve the quality of news.

Zuckerberg last week stressed that his platform has now become a ‘Fifth Estate’ in the world alongside traditional news media and people no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard.

“People no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard, and that has important consequences,” he said. (IANS)