Thursday April 25, 2019
Home Lead Story Facebook Asks...

Facebook Asks If Men Could Request Sexual Photos From Minors

"Facebook users decide the rules by voting and tell Facebook"

0
//
Facebook has over 217 million monthly active users in India and 212 million of them are active on smartphones. Pixabay
Facebook has over 217 million monthly active users in India and 212 million of them are active on smartphones. Pixabay

Facebook has admitted that a survey asking users whether it should allow an adult man to ask a 14-year-old girl for sexual pictures was a “mistake”.

The social network ran a survey for some users on Sunday asking how they thought the company should handle grooming behavior, the Guardian reported on Monday.

The questions appeared on some users’ home feeds.

ALSO READ: Ten Hilarious Facebook Memes Cover Photos that will Make You Laugh Out Loud

Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay

“In thinking about an ideal world where you could set Facebook’s policies, how would you handle the following: a private message in which an adult man asks a 14-year-old girl for sexual pictures,” posed one of the survey questions.

The responses available to users included: “This content should be allowed on Facebook, and I would not mind seeing it”; “This content should be allowed on Facebook but I don’t want to see it”; “This content should not be allowed on Facebook and no one should be able to see it” and “I have no preference on this topic”.

A second question asked who should decide the rules around whether or not the adult man should be allowed to ask for such pictures on Facebook.

Responses available included “Facebook users decide the rules by voting and tell Facebook” and “Facebook decides the rules on its own”.

send your own nudes to yourself
Facebook is coming up with a method to prevent revenge porn if you send your own nudes to yourself. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Why Facebook blocking posts in India is necessary

In neither survey question did Facebook allow users to indicate that law enforcement or child protection should be involved in the situation, the Guardian report said.

Facebook’s Vice President of Product, Guy Rosen, admitted the surveys was “a mistake”.

“We run surveys to understand how the community thinks about how we set policies,” Rosen was quoted as saying.

“But this kind of activity is and will always be completely unacceptable on Facebook. We regularly work with authorities if identified. It shouldn’t have been part of this survey. That was a mistake,” he said. (IANS)

Next Story

New Zealand, France Plan in Effort to Stop Promotion of Terrorism, Violent Extremism on Social Media

A lone gunman killed 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15, while livestreaming the massacre on Facebook

0
facebook, christchurch attack, new zealand
FILE - The Facebook logo is seen on a shop window in Malaga, Spain, June 4, 2018. (VOA)

In the wake of the Christchurch attack, New Zealand said on Wednesday that it would work with France in an effort to stop social media from being used to promote terrorism and violent extremism.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said in a statement that she will co-chair a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on May 15 that will seek to have world leaders and CEOs of tech companies agree to a pledge, called the Christchurch Call, to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online.

A lone gunman killed 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15, while livestreaming the massacre on Facebook.

Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with 50 counts of murder for the mass shooting.

christchurch attack, new zealand, facebook
Students light candles as they gather for a vigil to commemorate victims of Friday’s shooting, outside the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 18, 2019. (VOA)

“It’s critical that technology platforms like Facebook are not perverted as a tool for terrorism, and instead become part of a global solution to countering extremism,” Ardern said in the statement.

“This meeting presents an opportunity for an act of unity between governments and the tech companies,” she added.

The meeting will be held alongside the Tech for Humanity meeting of G7 digital ministers, of which France is the chair, and France’s separate Tech for Good summit, both on 15 May, the statement said.

Ardern said at a press conference later on Wednesday that she has spoken with executives from a number of tech firms including Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, Google and few other companies.

“The response I’ve received has been positive. No tech company, just like no government, would like to see violent extremism and terrorism online,” Ardern said at the media briefing, adding that she had also spoken with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg directly on the topic.

christchurch attack, facebook, new zealand
Facebook, the world’s largest social network with 2.7 billion users, has faced criticism since the Christchurch attack that it failed to tackle extremism. VOA

A Facebook spokesman said the company looks forward to collaborating with government, industry and safety experts on a clear framework of rules.

“We’re evaluating how we can best support this effort and who among top Facebook executives will attend,” the spokesman said in a statement sent by email. Facebook, the world’s largest social network with 2.7 billion users, has faced criticism since the Christchurch attack that it failed to tackle extremism.

ALSO READ: Social Media Giant Facebook Announces First Browser API for Google Chrome

One of the main groups representing Muslims in France has said it was suing Facebook and YouTube, a unit of Alphabet’s Google, accusing them of inciting violence by allowing the streaming of the Christchurch massacre on their platforms.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said last month that the company was looking to place restrictions on who can go live on its platform based on certain criteria. (VOA)