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Facebook and Twitter Remain Divided due to Bloomberg’s Video

Facebook, Twitter divided over Bloomberg's video removal

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A video posted by Michael Bloomberg has left Facebook and Twitter divided on whether it violates their policies. Pixabay

A video posted by Michael Bloomberg, the aspirant for the Democratic Party’s nomination for President, has left Facebook and Twitter divided on whether it violates their policies.

According to The Verge, former New York Mayor Bloomberg’s 2020 presidential campaign posted a video to Twitter that was edited to make it appear as “though there was a long, embarrassing silence from Bloomberg’s Democratic opponents after he mentioned that he was the only candidate to have ever started a business”.

While Twitter said the video would be labelled as manipulated media under the platform’s new deepfakes policy, Facebook said the same video would not violate the platform’s deepfakes rules.

Facebook’s policy “does not extend to content that is parody or satire, or video that has been edited solely to omit or change the order of words”.

Facebook Twitter
While Twitter said the video would be labelled as manipulated media under the platform’s new deepfakes policy, Facebook said the same video would not violate the platform’s deepfakes rules. Pixabay

Earlier this month, Facebook, Twitter and Google-owned YouTube refused to pull down an edited video posted by US President Donald Trump that showed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ripping up a copy of the former’s State of the Union address.

The five-minute video, posted on Trump’s social media accounts, shows Pelosi tearing up the speech after Trump honoured several Americans and saluted a Tuskegee airman in the audience.

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The fact of the matter is that Pelosi ripped up the speech after Trump concluded his address on an earlier date.

Facebook and Twitter had refused to remove an earlier “deepfake” video of Pelosi that was edited to give the impression she is slurring her words. (IANS)

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WhatsApp Limits Frequency of Forwarding Messages

WhatsApp limits frequently forwarding messages to 1 chat at a time

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WhatsApp
WhatsApp announced to introduce a new limit on frequently forwarding messages where a WhatsApp user can forward such messages to one chat at a time. Pixabay

In a bid to curb the flow of misinformation in COVID-19 times, Facebook-owned WhatsApp on Tuesday announced to introduce a new limit on frequently forwarding messages where a WhatsApp user can forward such messages to one chat at a time.

This limit kicks in once a message has been previously forwarded five times or more, the company said in a statement.

The chat-app, which has over 400 million users in India last year introduced users to the concept of messages that have been forwarded many times.

These messages are labeled with double arrows to indicate they did not originate from a close contact. In effect, these messages are less personal compared to typical messages sent on the app.

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“We are now introducing a limit so that these messages can only be forwarded to one chat at a time,” the company said in a statement.

WhatsApp
WhatsApp is working with NGOs and governments, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and over 20 national health ministries, to help connect people with accurate information. Pixabay

The company said it bans two million accounts per month for attempting to send bulk or automated messages.

The social media app set global limits on forwarded messages to constrain virality in January last year where it restricted forwarding messaging to five times from an individual or a group.

“We set limits on forwarded messages to constrain virality which led to a 25 per cent decrease in message forwards globally at the time,” informed WhatsApp.

In recent weeks, people have also used WhatsApp to organize public moments of support for frontline health workers.

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“However, we’ve seen a significant increase in the amount of forwarding which users have told us can feel overwhelming and can contribute to the spread of misinformation,” WhatsApp noted, adding that it’s important to slow the spread of these messages down to keep WhatsApp a place for personal conversation.

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The chat-app is working with NGOs and governments, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and over 20 national health ministries, to help connect people with accurate information.
It has also announced the WhatsApp Coronavirus Information Hub. (IANS)