Thursday February 21, 2019
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Facebook Won’t Remove Content for Being False

"Even if it is a horrible assertion of falsity, whether it's about the Holocaust or any other world even, we don't remove content simply for being false," Bickert, Facebook's Head of Global Policy Management added.

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Facebook releases Messenger redesign on Android, iOS. Pixabay

Even as the world painfully takes notes of dangers of fake news spread on social media platforms, Facebook has said that it does not remove content simply for being false.

While the social network platform has in place rules against hate speech and takes personal attacks seriously, false content does not face censorship on its platform, Monika Bickert, Facebook’s Head of Global Policy Management said on Thursday while participating in “Hard Questions”, a series that explores the most challenging issues Facebook confronts.

“We don’t allow hate speech on Facebook because it creates an environment where people feel personally attacked, where they won’t feel comfortable coming and sharing themselves,” Bickert said.

“The one thing that we don’t remove is where someone simply asserts something false,” she said, adding that Facebook tries to counter the virality of such content or tries to promote or make visible other views.

We don't remove content for being false: Facebook
Rumours on social media have been linked to real world violence in several countries. Flickr Common

“Even if it is a horrible assertion of falsity, whether it’s about the Holocaust or any other world even, we don’t remove content simply for being false,” Bickert added.

The statement bears significance at a time when rumours on social media platforms have been linked to real world violence in several countries, including India.

Also Read: Facebook will not Remove Fake News- but will ‘Demote’ it

Facebook, Bickert said, also considers local regulations while blocking content on the platform.

“And we also block the speech where countries have told us, ‘this is illegal in our country’, then we will remove that speech in that country alone,” she said. (IANS)

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Social Networking Giant Facebook Interested in Blockchain-based Authentication, Says Mark Zuckerberg

According to The Verge, the risk of further data-sharing scandals is one of the main reasons why Facebook is wary of implementing the change

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Facebook
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA

You may soon login to Facebook with Blockchain-based authentication, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has indicated.

In a public interview with Harvard Law professor Jonathan Zittrain late on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said he is “potentially interested” in putting the Facebook login on the Blockchain technology.

“I’m thinking about going back to decentralised or Blockchain authentication. Although I haven’t figured out a way to make this work out but this is around authentication and basically granting access to your information and to different services,” Mark Zuckerberg told Zittrain.

According to him, Blockchain could give users more powers when granting data access to third-party apps.

Facebook last year promoted one of its senior engineers Evan Cheng as the Director of Engineering at its recently launched Blockchain division.

Earlier in May, Facebook set up a group within the company to explore Blockchain technology and its potential use for the platform, headed by Messenger chief David Marcus.

Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce and Judiciary committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. VOA

Media reports also said Facebook was exploring to develop its own cryptocurrency.

Facebook has over 2.3 billion users globally and launching cryptocurrency will allow them make payments using a virtual currency like Bitcoin.

In a statement, Facebook said: “Like many other companies, Facebook is exploring ways to leverage the power of Blockchain technology”.

Also Read- Whatsapp Security Bug Allows iPhone Users Bypass Security Controls

According to The Verge, the risk of further data-sharing scandals is one of the main reasons why Facebook is wary of implementing the change.

“You basically take your information, you store it on some decentralised system and you have the choice of whether to log in different places and you’re not going through an intermediary. There’s a lot of things that I think would be quite attractive about that,” said Mark Zuckerberg. (IANS)