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Facebook Actively Working on Launching WhatsApp Pay Soon

Facebook said it won’t store sensitive data in countries where it might be improperly accessed because of the weak rule of law or governments that can forcibly get access to users’ data

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facebook is upbeat on the growth of digital payments in India and is actively working on launching WhatsApp Pay soon, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said.

In an earnings call with analysts late Wednesday, Zuckerberg said the company is building out Payments for the global market.

“We have a test that is running in India for WhatsApp now, we’re hoping to launch in several other countries at some point, but I don’t want to put a timeframe on that here, but it’s something that we’re actively working on,” he said.

WhatsApp Pay, stuck owing to India’s demand to store data locally, has not gone beyond the beta testing it did with nearly one million users last year.

“In Instagram and Facebook, you have shopping, and you have Marketplace and you have all the tens of millions of small businesses that use pages and a lot that use Instagram for sharing their inventory and being able to help people discover and pay.

“When you’re using a messaging service, that everything there is very intimate and private so it feels like a more natural space to be interacting with a business in a private way for doing transactions,” Zuckerberg added.

Facebook daily active users reached 1.56 billion, up 8 per cent compared to last year, led by growth in India, Indonesia and the Philippines.

This represents approximately 66 per cent of the 2.38 billion monthly active users in March.

According to Zuckerberg, privacy is the biggest area for the future of social networking.

“Today, people increasingly want the intimacy of connecting privately as well. So, I think there also needs to be a digital equivalent of the living room — a platform just as built out with all of the ways you’d want to interact privately,” said the Facebook CEO.

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Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA

He said the digital town squares like Facebook and Instagram will always be important and will only continue to grow in importance.

“Over time, I believe there’s an even bigger opportunity with the digital living room to build a platform focused on privacy. We all need to communicate privately, and this service could be even more important in our lives. So, I think we should focus our efforts on building this privacy-focused platform,” he noted.

The privacy-focused platform will be built around private interactions.

“You should have simple, intimate spaces where you have complete confidence that what you say and do is private. Encryption. Your private communications should be secure, and end-to-end encryption prevents anyone – including even us – from seeing what you share,” Zuckerberg added.

Also Read- Xiaomi Launches 2 Budget Smartphones in India

“You shouldn’t have to worry about what you share coming back to hurt you later, so we won’t keep around messages or Stories for longer than necessary,” he noted.

Facebook said it won’t store sensitive data in countries where it might be improperly accessed because of the weak rule of law or governments that can forcibly get access to users’ data. (IANS)

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Social Networking Giant Facebook Suspends Several Apps Post-Cambridge Analytica Probe

Facebook has also removed a number of application programming interfaces (APIs), the channels that developers use to access various types of data

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Corporate, America, Climate Change
FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

Facebook has suspended thousands of apps associated with nearly 400 developers for a variety of reasons, as it continues to investigate suspicious apps after the Cambridge Analytica data scandal.

The social networking giant said that it is not yet confirmed these apps were posing a threat to people.

“Many were not live but were still in their testing phase when we suspended them. It is not unusual for developers to have multiple test apps that never get rolled out.

“In many cases, the developers did not respond to our request for information so we suspended them, honouring our commitment to take action,” Facebook said in a blog post on Friday.

Facebook began its “App Developer Investigation” in March 2018 as part of its response to the Cambridge Analytica data scandal.

The company aimed to review all of the apps that had access to large amounts of information before it changed its platform policies in 2014.

“Our App Developer Investigation is by no means finished. But there is meaningful progress to report so far. To date, this investigation has addressed millions of apps,” Facebook said.

Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

In a few cases, Facebook has banned some apps completely.

“That can happen for any number of reasons including inappropriately sharing data obtained from us, making data publicly available without protecting people’s identity or something else that was in clear violation of our policies,” the company said.

In May, Facebook filed a lawsuit in California against Rankwave, a South Korean data analytics company that failed to cooperate with its investigation.

Also Read: Tanzania Refuses to Provide Detailed Information on Ebola Cases

“We’ve also taken legal action against developers in other contexts. For example, we filed an action against LionMobi and JediMobi, two companies that used their apps to infect users’ phones with malware in a profit-generating scheme,” it added.

Facebook has also removed a number of application programming interfaces (APIs), the channels that developers use to access various types of data.

“We have clarified that we can suspend or revoke a developer’s access to any API that it has not used in the past 90 days. And we will not allow apps on Facebook that request a disproportionate amount of information from users relative to the value they provide,” the company said. (IANS)