Friday April 19, 2019
Home India 10 Facts You ...

10 Facts You Need To Know About Homi Bhabha

Homi Bhabha was elected as the 1st chairman of the first United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy

0
//
Homi Bhabha was the man looking after the entire progress of research facility. Wikimedia Commons
Homi Bhabha was the man looking after the entire progress of research facility. Wikimedia Commons
  • Homi Jehangir Bhabha was one the first scientists from India who researched on nuclear program
  • In 1944, Homi Bhabha started a new unit in Indian Institute of Science
  • Due to his contribution to India’s nuclear program, he earned the title of ‘Father of Indian Nuclear Programme’

NEW DELHI: After the First World War, the topic of nuclear research was very much into the discussion. Every country was trying their best to refine their knowledge about the nuclear program. Homi Jehangir Bhabha was one the first scientists from India who dived deep into this subject. Homi Bhabha stressed upon formulating a strategy to extract power from the country’s vast thorium reserves rather than it’s going out for uranium reserves. This observation of Homi Bhabha was very much contrary to many of the countries. But for India, it experiments thoroughly explained our scientists the importance of nuclear research and energy.

When World War II broke out in 1939, Homi Bhabha was in India for a yearly vacation. But, due to the outbreak of the war, he was able to leave India. While he was forced to stay in India, he was persuaded by C.V. Raman to become a reader in physics at the famous Indian Institute of Science located in Bengaluru. C.V. Raman was a Nobel Laureate in Physics.

Also Read: 10 must-know facts about Anand Mahindra

Out of curiosity, Homi Bhabha accepted the offer and started his work in Physics. During that very time, he came in direct contact with Congress Party and convinced the party leaders that India needs a nuclear program. One of the several Congress Leaders was Jawaharlal Nehru was who was convinced with what Bhabha had projected.

Homi Bhabha was very much against the use of nuclear power for the weapons production. Wikimedia Commons
Homi Bhabha was very much against the use of nuclear power for the weapons production. Wikimedia Commons

In 1944, Homi Bhabha started a new unit in Indian Institute of Science and it was the much renowned Cosmic Ray Research Institute. In the same year, he conveyed his message to the trustees of Sir Dorabji Tata Trust for special facilities for working with cosmic rays; nuclear physics, high energy physics and other areas of physics. Homi Bhabha was successful in his endeavour and was granted financial help for establishing Tata Institute of Fundamental Research. Finally n 1945, the research facility was established at Royal Yacht Club’s old buildings, Bombay. The Government of Bombay was also a co-sponsor of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

Also Read: 15 Facts To Know About Arnab Goswami and Republic TV

Take a look at some of the facts related to Homi Bhabha.

1. Being a painter himself, Homi Bhabha was very much fascinated towards arts and culture. His this interest was accompanied by classical music and opera.
2. Homi Bhabha also worked with the great physicist, Niels Bohr and played a major role in the development of The Quantum Theory. He is been credited with identifying and naming the Meson Particle which was a significant mystery of that time.
3. In 1955, Homi Bhabha was elected as the 1st chairman of the first United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy.
4. Homi Bhabha was the founder and director of leading research institutions of India. One was Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and another one was Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

Homi Bhabha was awarded the Adams Prize in 1942 and a Padma Bhushan in 1954. Wikimedia Commons
Homi Bhabha was awarded the Adams Prize in 1942 and a Padma Bhushan in 1954. Wikimedia Commons

5. Homi Bhabha was very much against the use of nuclear power for the weapons production and discouraged the nuclear armament. He advocated the utilization of atomic energy to alleviate poverty.

Also Read: 11 Must-Know Facts About Indian Air Force

6. Homi Bhabha researched with German Physicist Walter Heitler for the development of the Cascade Theory. This testing helped them to better understand cosmic radiation.
7. Homi Bhabha holds a graduate degree in mechanical engineering. After completing his studies, he started his research on the nuclear program.
8. Homi Bhabha was so much into his work and passion that he remained a bachelor throughout his life.
9. Homi Bhabha stayed in a sprawling colonial bungalow known as Mehrangir in Malabar Hills.
10. For his dedication and discoveries in the nuclear program, Homi Bhabha was awarded the Adams Prize in 1942 and a Padma Bhushan in 1954. Later, he was also honoured with Fellow of the Royal Society.

Homi Bhabha was the founder and director of leading research institutions of India. Wikimedia Commons
Homi Bhabha was the founder and director of leading research institutions of India. Wikimedia Commons

11. Homi Bhabha is known for Indian Nuclear Program, Cascade Process of Cosmic Radiations Point Particles, Habha Scattering and Theoretical Prediction of Muon.
12. Due to Homi Bhabha’s contribution to India’s nuclear program, he earned the title of ‘Father of Indian Nuclear Programme’.

Also Read: 10 Things You Should know About Neerja Bhanot

Homi Bhabha’s death still remains one of the biggest mysteries in the history of India. As per official records, he passed away in an aeroplane crash in Switzerland on January 24, 1966. But as per various reports, Homi Bhabha was poisoned by CIA because America at that point was threatened by the advancements made by him and thus assassinated him by shooting his plane down.

Next Story

Is NYAY Going To Be A Game Changer for Congress?

The concerns about funds being used for harmful purposes cannot be ruled out. It is due to these challenges many policymakers suggest that instead of making welfare payments to poor households in the form of unrestricted cash transfers the government should focus on in-kind transfers.

0
Congress on Friday promised to create one crore jobs across the southern state
Congress state units given more power for 2019 battle- wikimedia commons

By Amit Kapoor & Manisha Kapoor 

The idea of launching Nyuntam Aay Yojana, a cash transfer scheme that intends to provide Rs 72,000 per year to the poorest 20 per cent Indian families, by the Congress Party if it comes to power, has stirred a debate among the policymakers about whether the move is economically viable or is just a tactic by the Congress Party to garner votes in the upcoming general elections.

The discussions are foreseeable, provided that this intervention to ensure basic income to the poor households will cost the country somewhere between 1.5 per cent to 3.4 per cent of GDP, a number higher than the government’s expenditure on healthcare and education. The implementation of NYAY means an additional cost between Rs 3.6 lakh crore to Rs 7.2 lakh crore per year.

To put things in perspective, the expenditure of the proposed scheme is 2.2 times the budget of all centrally sponsored schemes. The party claims that they have worked out all the fiscal calculations before launching the scheme. However, this will be a major dent in India’s budget expenditure and will explode the fiscal deficit from the current 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent.

money
An impact evaluation study by UNICEF in Sub-Saharan Africa showed that with the exception of temporary price rise during payment period, cash transfers has no impact on the prices. Pixabay

Apart from fiscal prudence, the other immediate concern surrounding the scheme is the identification of beneficiaries and the database that will be used for this. There is no official income database available with the government at the individual level and since most of the poor work in unorganised rural areas, there is no direct way of verifying their incomes such as through a payroll or income tax.

The proponents of the approach state that a good starting point could be Socio Economic Caste Census of 2011 if one goes by multi-dimensional aspect of poverty. However, one can’t ignore the fact that even if the scheme defines poverty by assets and not income for quick exclusion rules, the data is outdated. A scheme targeted at reducing poverty can’t use data that is seven-eight years old. Even if one ignores that, it should be noted that there are major methodological issues with how data was collected. This is reflected in the discrepancies that exist in the data collected through SECC and other governmental data. A fresh survey for the identification process will lead to possibilities of corruption as in other targeted schemes. For instance, various studies have shown that many people who are not below poverty line have BPL cards.

One should also keep in mind that there exist significant disparities across Indian states and districts in terms of income levels and affordability of basic needs such as education, healthcare etc. Therefore, the same amount that means a lot to a person living in a low-income state or a state that has good access to public facilities such as public hospitals, schools etc would not be enough for a person trying to make a living in a high-income region. As a result, a prerequisite for such a scheme is a detailed regional level survey on income characteristics of Indian states and districts.

money

To put things in perspective, the expenditure of the proposed scheme is 2.2 times the budget of all centrally sponsored schemes. The party claims that they have worked out all the fiscal calculations before launching the scheme. Pixabay

Another major concern surrounding the scheme is its inflationary implications. It is argued that the act of transferring cash to the target population will boost their purchasing power, which would lead to an increase in demand for goods and services and, thus, push prices upwards. Advocates of the approach have tried to argue that studies around the world present a lot of evidence to the contrary.

An impact evaluation study by UNICEF in Sub-Saharan Africa showed that with the exception of temporary price rise during payment period, cash transfers has no impact on the prices. However, these evidences should be considered with a pinch of salt. They rest on the assumption that the money will be spent on useful goods, that will help the local economy in becoming more productive. Though this will not be the case always.

Also Read: Food Unites People Across The Globe

The concerns about funds being used for harmful purposes cannot be ruled out. It is due to these challenges many policymakers suggest that instead of making welfare payments to poor households in the form of unrestricted cash transfers the government should focus on in-kind transfers. This idea is supported by claim that in-kind transfers will help by encouraging the consumption of right things, such as healthy food.

Given India’s concerns about rising unemployment rates, jobless growth and the fact that we need to have effective utilization of our young population to gain a competitive edge over other economies, the promoters are trying to project that NYAY can prove to be a game changer. However, for the Indian economy, a better alternative would be to strengthen the existing public services landscape by removing social, political and personal barriers, along with carrying out structural reforms that leads to creation of more productive jobs. (IANS)