Thursday April 25, 2019

Family Dinners Promote Healthy Eating Habits in Teenagers

But finding that time once a day — even if it’s breakfast together — can be just as effective, the researcher said. For the study, the team looked at more than 2,700 participants, 14 to 24 years of age

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Family dinners can promote healthy eating habits in teenagers. Pixabay

Teenagers and young adults having dinners together with their families are more likely to have healthier eating habits than those who eat alone, a new study has revealed. The researchers found that when families sit down together, adolescents and young adults eat more fruits and veggies and consume fewer fast-food.

“It’s a time when families can slow down from their busy days to talk, spend time together and problem-solve. It’s also a time that parents can model healthful eating behaviours,” Walton added. The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, found that preparing and enjoying a meal together can also help families bond and the meal does not have to be a big drawn-out affair.

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The research has found that family dinners are a great way to improve the dietary intake of the whole family, regardless of how well the family functions together. Pixabay

“Even if it’s something you pull out of the freezer, add a bagged salad on the side and you’ll have a decent nutritional meal,” said Jess Haines, Professor from the University of Guelph in Canada. Walton said many teenaged and young adults living at home are busy with evening extracurricular activities or part-time jobs, making it hard to find time for dinner with family members.

Also Read- Best Ways to Get Additional Funds For Marriage Expenses in India

But finding that time once a day — even if it’s breakfast together — can be just as effective, the researcher said. For the study, the team looked at more than 2,700 participants, 14 to 24 years of age. (IANS)

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Study Reveals, Screen Time Before Bed May Not Effect Well-Being in Adolescents

For the study, the team analysed data from Ireland, the US, and the UK and used a rigorous methodology to gather how much time an adolescent spends on screens per day, including both self-reported measures and time-use diaries. 

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The research examined more than 17,000 teenagers and found that adolescents' total screen time per day had little impact on their mental health, both on weekends and weekdays. Pixabay

Spending time online, gaming or watching TV, especially before bedtime, may not damage young people’s mental health, finds a new research challenging previous notions on screen time.

The study, published in Psychological Science journal, casts doubt on the widely-accepted relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents.

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“We found little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being, even if the use of digital technology occurs directly before bedtime,” added Professor Andrew Przybylski, at the University of Oxford. Pixabay

The research examined more than 17,000 teenagers and found that adolescents’ total screen time per day had little impact on their mental health, both on weekends and weekdays.

It also found that the use of digital screens 2 hours, 1 hour or 30 minutes before bedtime didn’t have clear associations with a decrease in adolescent well-being, even though this is often taken as a fact by media reports and public debates.

“We found little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being, even if the use of digital technology occurs directly before bedtime,” added Professor Andrew Przybylski, at the University of Oxford.

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It also found that the use of digital screens 2 hours, 1 hour or 30 minutes before bedtime didn’t have clear associations with a decrease in adolescent well-being, even though this is often taken as a fact by media reports and public debates.
Pixabay

Also Read: Think Twice Before Smoking, It is Slowly Turning You Blind

For the study, the team analysed data from Ireland, the US, and the UK and used a rigorous methodology to gather how much time an adolescent spends on screens per day, including both self-reported measures and time-use diaries.

“Implementing best practice statistical and methodological techniques, we found little evidence for substantial negative associations between digital-screen engagement and adolescent well-being,” said Amy Orben, researcher at the varsity. (IANS)