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Family members blame Kolkata private hospital for patient’s death due to Negligence and Wrong Treatment

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Media Superspecialty Clinic in Kolkata, Wikimedia

Kolkata, March 13, 2017: Family members of a patient on Monday lodged a police complaint, blaming a private hospital in the city of negligence and wrong treatment for his death.

The wife of Sunil Pandey, who died at the Medica Superspecialty Hospital on Monday morning, alleged that he died due to “wrong treatment and negligence” on the part of the hospital and lodged a police complaint.

“We have received a complaint from the wife of the deceased about the patient’s sudden death at the hospital. We will look into the issue once we get the autopsy report,” an officer from East Jadavpur Police Station said.

Pandey, who was admitted with chest pain, got admitted to the hospital on March 6 and underwent multiple surgeries, including a leg amputation in the last few days. On Monday morning, doctors at the hospital declared him dead.

“He did not have blood sugar, high blood pressure or any major health issues. We took him to the hospital as he felt chest pain, but his condition drastically deteriorated after the surgery,” the widow alleged.

“The hospital finished him by doing wrong treatment. I have lodged a police complaint against them for taking him away from us. I want justice in this case so that no one else has to go through the same in future,” she said.

According to the patient’s side, Pandey underwent cardiac surgery which the hospital claimed to be successful. However, the doctors amputated one of his legs as there was a major blood clot.

“Why did he have the blood clot in his leg if the cardiac operation was successful? Why could not they save him in spite of the leg amputation? The hospital is asking for 48 hours to produce the case history details. This clearly shows there is an issue of negligence at their end,” a friend of the deceased said.

The hospital authorities, however, rubbished the allegations and said proper course of action was followed during the patient’s treatment.

“The incident is unfortunate, but I am certain that the doctors here followed a proper course of action that was required for the patient’s treatment. The condition of the patient was critical and we kept the patient party updated on his condition at every point,” a doctor from the hospital said.

“We had to go through the leg amputation as a standard treatment procedure as the blood supply to that leg had completely stopped due to massive blood clots in the vein. The unresponsive body part had to be removed to stop the entire body from rotting,” he added. (IANS)

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Kim Jong Un’s Doctor For The Right Price, North Korea Hospitals Work For Money

“The hospitals are for privileged people, but since state support is so small, they would be difficult to run properly without extra money from ordinary patients,”

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In this Feb. 20, 2013 photo, a doctor speaks on a phone at the reception area of a newly-built breast cancer research facility at Pyongyang Maternity Hospital in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder). RFA

A medical facility specifically catering North Korea’s privileged elites has been forced to open its doors to common citizens in exchange for bribes, in an effort to stem financial difficulties, sources say.

Pyongyang’s Bonghwa Medical Center offers top-notch medical care, but has officially only been available to Kim Jong Un and Workers’ Party officials of the highest ranks.

Now strapped for cash, the hospital will admit anyone who greases the palms of the right people. While health care is officially free for all citizens, hospitals for elites, like Bongwha are a step above what citizens typically have access to.

“My nephew is a doctor and he has been suffering from stomach problems for more than 10 years. He was [recently] treated at Bonghwa Medical Center and has been healed completely,” said a source from North Pyongan province in an interview with RFA’s Korean Service.

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In 2010, the World Health Organization controversially described North Korea’s universal health care system as “the envy of the developing world,” contradicting a report from Amnesty International that same year that said the country’s hospitals were barely functioning and unable to deal with epidemics and rampant malnutrition. Pixabay

“It cost him a lot of money to get treated [there], but now I have come to realize that money can do anything,” said the source.

The source said Bonghwa is known as “the best hospital in the Republic,” and that it is reserved for politically important people, expressing disgust that it could now be bought into.

“It is surprising that ordinary people can [get] medical treatment [there] if they bribe them. I feel bitter because there’s nothing money can’t do in this society,” said the source.

The source noted that bribery is not unique to Bonghwa — other well-regarded hospitals are doing the same.

“Well-known hospitals in Pyongyang, including Kim Man-yu Hospital, Namsan Hospital, and the Red Cross Hospital are treating a number of ordinary patients from other regions. They are getting medical treatment because they have bribed high-rank officials,” said the source.

The source said that patients of Bonghwa and the other hospitals have access to medicines that aren’t available to the general public, but these too come with a hefty price tag for the patients who have bribed their way in.

“Since they are not high-ranking officials, ordinary patients have to pay a lot for these prescription drugs. It’s like the hospitals are earning foreign cash off patients,” the source said.

Even if a patient has the means to get into the good hospitals, the level of care can still differ depending on how much was paid in bribe.

“If you give a large amount, they will even treat you better than a high-ranking official from the Central Committee [of the Workers’ Party.]”

A North Korean defector surnamed Lee who settled in South Korea confirmed the North Korean medical industry’s state of affairs.

“In the past, hospitals that have been designated only for high-ranking officials in Pyongyang have ignored their mandate and provided care to ordinary patients,” said Lee, adding, “Without taking bribes from these people, it would be difficult for hospitals to stay open, and for doctors to make an actual living.”

“That’s just how things are in the North Korean medical industry,” said Lee.

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“It cost him a lot of money to get treated [there], but now I have come to realize that money can do anything,” said the source. Pixabay
“Medical equipment and hospital supplies provided by the outside world, supposedly as humanitarian aid, all go to these elite hospitals,” said Lee.

“The hospitals are for privileged people, but since state support is so small, they would be difficult to run properly without extra money from ordinary patients,” Lee said.

Also Read: Milestone in The Diplomatic War on Terror, As Beijing Agrees To Declare JeM Chief Masood Azhar Terrorist

In 2010, the World Health Organization controversially described North Korea’s universal health care system as “the envy of the developing world,” contradicting a report from Amnesty International that same year that said the country’s hospitals were barely functioning and unable to deal with epidemics and rampant malnutrition.

In February, The New Humanitarian published a report describing North Korea’s “silent health crisis,” which acknowledged a recent improvement in public health within the country, but described its health system as inadequate. The Geneva-based news outlet founded by the United Nations said that a formal peace agreement with the United States and South Korea would not in and of itself improve North Korea’s health care situation. (IANS)