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Farmers who sought permission to kill self get their dues

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Nagpur: The dues of seven farmers who sought permission to commit suicide have been cleared, an official said on Wednesday.

“We have disbursed the amounts and deposited them directly in their bank accounts,” Wardha collector Ashutosh Sahil said.
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He said that the problems arose mainly because the district administration did not have the correct bank details of the seven farmers, but the entire issue has now been amicably resolved.

“We welcome the collector’s prompt steps in the matter which has helped save the lives of these seven distressed farmers. We hope they take up other pending cases with similar seriousness before more lives are lost,” said Vidarbha Jan Andolan Samiti President Kishore Tiwari.

The seven farmers, including three women, of Wadad village wrote to the authorities seeking ‘permission’ to commit suicide as they were not given the aid money since January.

The bemused district officials not only accepted the letter, but gave acknowledgement which was submitted to the collector office, with copies to high-ranking officials in Mumbai.

The farmers are: Kishore Ingale, Bhanudas Wadadkar, Pankaj Gawandi, Shankar Khadse, and the women – Kundabai Lonkar, Kamala Warhade and Vasanta Gingavkar.

Collector Sahil said that as per norms, these farmers have been disbursed an average of Rs.9,000-Rs.13,000 depending on the crop losses they suffered in the hailstorms last year.

Tiwari, however, pointed out that around Rs.300 crore amount is lying undisbursed within the Amravati division which should be cleared immediately to prevent more farmers from ending their lives.

In July so far, the number of farmland suicides in the states stands at 27 and activists fear the situation may worsen if the existing dry spell continues in the state.

(IANS)

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Suicide Rates On The Rise Among U.S. Workers

Promoting social interaction rather than isolation in daily tasks on the job may help with suicide prevention.

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Suicide, Life expectancy
A young volunteer helps set up lights in paper bags decorated with messages for loved ones during an Out of the Darkness Walk event organized by the Cincinnati Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. VOA

From 2000 to 2016, the U.S. suicide rate among those aged 16 to 64 rose 34 percent, from 12.9 deaths for every 100,000 people in the population to 17.3 per 100,000, according to the study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The highest suicide rate among men was for workers in construction and mining jobs, with 43.6 deaths for every 100,000 workers in 2012 and 53.2 deaths per 100,000 in 2015, the analysis found.

The highest suicide rate among women was for workers in arts, design, entertainment, sports and media, with 11.7 fatalities for every 100,000 workers in 2012 and 15.6 deaths per 100,000 in 2015.

“Since most adults spend a great deal of their time at work, the workplace is an important and underutilized venue for suicide prevention,” said study co-author Deborah Stone, a behavioral scientist at the CDC in Atlanta.

Facebook, U.S., workers
A man works in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content, in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

While the study wasn’t designed to prove whether or how specific types of jobs or workplace characteristics might contribute to the risk of suicide, lack of control over employment and a lack of job security can both be stressors that make suicide more likely, Stone said by email.

Many factors outside the workplace can also influence the risk of suicide, including relationship problems, substance use, physical or mental health, finances or legal problems, Stone added.

And ready access to guns and other weapons have a big impact on whether suicidal thoughts turn into actions with fatal outcomes, Stone said.

Guns may explain the higher suicide rates among men than among women, said Gary Namie, director of the Workplace Bullying Institute in Boise, Idaho.

“In America, with ready access to guns, men make the choice of death by gun, but it is the less likely choice by females,” Namie, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. “Hence, it is possible that in moments of despair that might pass if friends or family could intervene, with a gun handy, the decision is too quickly implemented.”

workers
To assess suicide rates by occupation, the CDC examined data collected from 17 states in 2012 and 2015.

Data from 17 states

To assess suicide rates by occupation, the CDC examined data collected from 17 states in 2012 and 2015; the results are not representative of the nation as a whole. The results were published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Although arts, design, entertainment, sports and media had the highest suicide rates among women, this category saw the biggest increase in suicide rate among men during the study. For women, the biggest increase in suicide rates was in the food service industry.

One limitation of the study is that it didn’t examine suicide methods. It also excluded two groups of Americans that typically have stressors that can increase their risk of suicide: military veterans and unemployed people.

Even so, the results suggest that employers can play a role in suicide prevention by offering worksite wellness programs, encouraging use of behavioral and mental health services, and training workers in the warning signs of suicide and how to respond, Stone said.

Also Read: Suicides Can Be Prevented, Says Expert Through Government Policies

Promoting social interaction rather than isolation in daily tasks on the job may also help with suicide prevention, along with creating a workplace culture of inclusion that does not allow for abusive conduct or bullying, Namie said.

The road to suicide begins when one employee begins a “systematic campaign of interpersonal destruction against another employee,” Namie said. “Bullying is the most preventable predictor of suicide.” (VOA)