Friday September 20, 2019

Potentially Fatal Pregnancy Can Now Be Detected By A Simple Blood Test, Claims Research

The PlGF testing was shown to reduce the average time to diagnose pre-eclampsia from four to two days and serious complications before birth (such as eclampsia, stroke, and maternal death) to four per cent from five per cent.

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pregnancy
There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit, the researchers said. Pixabay

A simple blood test can help diagnose a common but potentially fatal pregnancy complication — pre-eclampsia, finds a study published in The Lancet journal.

During the study, by measuring the concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF) in a woman’s blood, doctors were able to diagnose pre-eclampsia two days sooner on average.

“We knew monitoring PlGF was an accurate way to help detect the condition but were unsure whether making this tool available to clinicians would lead to better care for women. Now we know that it does,” said lead author Lucy Chappell from King’s College London.

pregnancy
For the study, the research team studied 1,035 women with suspected pre-eclampsia from 11 maternity units across the UK. They were randomly assigned to two groups — one had their PlGF test results made available to their clinical team, the other did not. Pixabay

Pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterised by high blood pressure, sometimes with fluid retention and proteinuria, can cause damage to vital organs, fits and can be fatal for the woman and baby, if left untreated. Globally, 100 women die due to pre-eclampsia every day.

“For the last hundred years, we have diagnosed pre-eclampsia by measuring blood pressure and checking for protein in a woman’s urine. These are relatively imprecise and often quite subjective,” Chappell noted.

blood
During the study, by measuring the concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF) in a woman’s blood, doctors were able to diagnose pre-eclampsia two days sooner on average. Pixabay

For the study, the research team studied 1,035 women with suspected pre-eclampsia from 11 maternity units across the UK. They were randomly assigned to two groups — one had their PlGF test results made available to their clinical team, the other did not.

Also Read: Surrogate Mother for Son, 61 Year Old Mother Becomes The Support

The PlGF testing was shown to reduce the average time to diagnose pre-eclampsia from four to two days and serious complications before birth (such as eclampsia, stroke, and maternal death) to four per cent from five per cent.

There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit, the researchers said. (IANS)

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Paracetamol During Pregnancy Can Risk Child’s Behaviour

Women who take paracetamol during pregnancy are at risk of having children with behaviour problems, warn researchers

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paracetamol, pregnancy, risk, behaviour
The study found an association between paracetamol intake and behavioural issues in children including hyperactivity and attention-deficit disorder. Pixabay

Women who take paracetamol during pregnancy are at risk of having children with behaviour problems, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of six month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17.

“Our findings add to a series of results concerning evidence of the possible adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy such as issues with asthma or behaviour in the offspring,” said study lead author Jean Golding, Professor at the University of Bristol in the UK.

“It reinforces the advice that women should be cautious when taking medication during pregnancy and to seek medical advice where necessary,” Golding said.

Using questionnaire and school information from Bristol’s Children of the 90s study, researchers examined 14,000 children.

paracetamol, pregnancy, risk, behaviour
Human ovaries exposed to paracetamol for a week in laboratories lost up to 40 per cent of their egg cells. Pixabay

When they were seven months pregnant, 43 per cent of their mothers said they had taken paracetamol “sometimes” or more often during the previous three months.

The researchers examined results of the children’s memory, IQ and pre-school development tests, temperament and behaviour measures.

The study found an association between paracetamol intake and behavioural issues in children including hyperactivity and attention-deficit disorder.

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However, this was no longer the case by the time the children reached the end of primary school.

According to the reseachers, boys appeared to be more susceptible than girls to the possible behavioural effects of the drug.

“It is important that our findings are tested in other studies – we were not in a position to show a causal link, rather an association between two outcomes,” Golding added. (IANS)