Thursday December 12, 2019

Potentially Fatal Pregnancy Can Now Be Detected By A Simple Blood Test, Claims Research

The PlGF testing was shown to reduce the average time to diagnose pre-eclampsia from four to two days and serious complications before birth (such as eclampsia, stroke, and maternal death) to four per cent from five per cent.

0
//
pregnancy
There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit, the researchers said. Pixabay

A simple blood test can help diagnose a common but potentially fatal pregnancy complication — pre-eclampsia, finds a study published in The Lancet journal.

During the study, by measuring the concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF) in a woman’s blood, doctors were able to diagnose pre-eclampsia two days sooner on average.

“We knew monitoring PlGF was an accurate way to help detect the condition but were unsure whether making this tool available to clinicians would lead to better care for women. Now we know that it does,” said lead author Lucy Chappell from King’s College London.

pregnancy
For the study, the research team studied 1,035 women with suspected pre-eclampsia from 11 maternity units across the UK. They were randomly assigned to two groups — one had their PlGF test results made available to their clinical team, the other did not. Pixabay

Pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterised by high blood pressure, sometimes with fluid retention and proteinuria, can cause damage to vital organs, fits and can be fatal for the woman and baby, if left untreated. Globally, 100 women die due to pre-eclampsia every day.

“For the last hundred years, we have diagnosed pre-eclampsia by measuring blood pressure and checking for protein in a woman’s urine. These are relatively imprecise and often quite subjective,” Chappell noted.

blood
During the study, by measuring the concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF) in a woman’s blood, doctors were able to diagnose pre-eclampsia two days sooner on average. Pixabay

For the study, the research team studied 1,035 women with suspected pre-eclampsia from 11 maternity units across the UK. They were randomly assigned to two groups — one had their PlGF test results made available to their clinical team, the other did not.

Also Read: Surrogate Mother for Son, 61 Year Old Mother Becomes The Support

The PlGF testing was shown to reduce the average time to diagnose pre-eclampsia from four to two days and serious complications before birth (such as eclampsia, stroke, and maternal death) to four per cent from five per cent.

There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Blood Test Can Identify Risk of Night-Time High Blood Pressure in People

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night

0
Blood Test
A simple Blood Test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient's cardiovascular risk, said the study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep.

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night. The new study, published in the European Respiratory Journal suggests a potential cause for reverse dipping that may help patients with sleep apnea get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.

“We can now identify those with OSA at the highest risk of cardiovascular problems in order to prevent them from developing additional complications,” said David Gozal from the University of Missouri School of Medicine in the US.

“We can treat those patients more aggressively to ensure they adhere to therapy and use their continuous positive airway pressure device (CPAP) properly,” Gozal said.

The researchers studied 46 patients diagnosed with OSA. They ranged in age from 18 to 70. Fifteen participants were identified to have a rise in blood pressure during sleep, while the remaining 31 participants had blood pressure readings that either remained the same or declined at night.

The researchers collected a blood sample from each participant to study the messages cells produce and send to each other through microscopic packages called exosomes.

Blood Test
Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep. Pixabay

“We found that the cell messages coming from participants with night-time elevated blood pressure were different than those transmitted in subjects with normal blood pressure,” Gozal said.

“The altered messages caused the cells that line the blood vessels to become dysfunctional. Those disturbed vessels allowed inflammatory cells to enter the vessels’ walls, causing hardening of those vessels and leading to cardiovascular disease.”

ALSO READ: Kids Born Through C-Section At Low Obesity Risk

Gozal said the cell message discovery will help clinicians personalise treatment for each patient diagnosed with OSA.

A simple blood test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient’s cardiovascular risk, said the study. (IANS)