Saturday July 20, 2019

Father’s Day Special: This is How a Father Should Spend Time with Kids

Children form an emotional bond with their caregivers, and it serves a purpose by keeping them safe, providing comfort and security, and modelling how relationships should work

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Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Researchers have found that fathers who spend lots of time helping out with childcare-related tasks on holidays develop stronger relationships with their kids.

The study published in the Journal of Family Psychology, reveals that both types of involvement — caregiving versus play — and the timing — workday versus non-workday — have an impact on the quality of the early father-child relationship.

“Fathers who make the choice to devote their time on non-workdays to engaging with their children directly seem to be developing the best relationships,” said Geoffrey Brown, Assistant Professor in the University of Georgia in the US.

For this study, the research team worked with 80 father-child pairs when the children were about 3 years old and conducted interviews and observed father-child interaction in the home, shooting video that was evaluated off-site and assigned a score indicating attachment security.

The researchers found that fathers who choose to spend time with their children on non-workdays are developing a stronger relationship with them.

Child, baby, father
A man twirls a young child on a waterfront park as downtown Seattle disappears in a smoky haze behind, Aug. 19, 2018. VOA

However, fathers who spend lots of time helping out with childcare-related tasks on workdays are developing the best relationships with their children.

Men who engage in high levels of play with their children on workdays actually have a slightly less secure attachment relationship with them, said the study.

According to the researchers, in early childhood, the most common way to conceptualise the parent-child relationship is the attachment relationship.

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Children form an emotional bond with their caregivers, and it serves a purpose by keeping them safe, providing comfort and security, and modelling how relationships should work.

“Ultimately, fathers who engage in a variety of parenting behaviours and adjust their parenting to suit the demands and circumstances of each individual day are probably most likely to develop secure relationships with their children,” said Brown. (IANS)

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Kids Who are Mocked by Parents at Greater Risk of Becoming Bullies

Constant criticism affects the self-esteem of a child, especially when done by parents

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Derisive behaviour is a unique form of parenting that increases the risk of adolescent children adopting inappropriate anger management strategies that increases their risk for peer difficulties. Pixabay

Dear parents, please take note. Kids who are mocked by parents are at a greater risk of becoming bullies and its victim too, researchers said, stressing that many bullies come from hostile, punitive and rejecting backgrounds.

According to experts, derisive behaviour is a unique form of parenting that increases the risk of adolescent children adopting inappropriate anger management strategies that increases their risk for peer difficulties.

“Constant criticism affects the self-esteem of a child, especially when done by parents. Children tend to feel inferior and lose their sense of confidence. This affects their relationship with parents, making them more vulnerable to various other forms of bullying that happen through their peers.

“Due to hesitation in seeking help, children end up enduring bullying. This has a long-term negative effect on their psyche and overall personality development,” Samir Parikh, Consultant Psychiatrist at Fortis Hospital in Delhi, told IANS.

Kids, Parents, Bullies
Kids who are mocked by parents are at a greater risk of becoming bullies and its victim too. Pixabay

Derisive parents use demeaning or belittling expressions that humiliate and frustrate the child, without any obvious provocation from the child. These parents respond to child engagement with criticism, sarcasm, put-downs, hostility and rely on emotional and physical coercion to obtain compliance.

Published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, the study in which researchers followed 1,409 children (aged 13-15 years) for three consecutive years, emphasized on the emotional underpinnings of peer difficulties.

It was found that derisive parenting fosters dysregulated anger in adolescent children. Increases in dysregulated anger, in turn, place adolescents at greater risk for bullying and victimization.

Dysregulated anger is indicative of difficulties regulating emotion, which typically results in negative emotions, verbal and physical aggression and hostility.

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The behaviour of parents as well as other close family members towards children does have a lasting impact on their personality and mental development, said mental health expert Prakriti Poddar, Director at Poddar Foundation in Mumbai.

“Subjecting a child to insult, mockery or derision creates a wave of repressed anger and frustration in the child. Imagine a child telling a parent or another family member about an incident or about his/her understanding of a subject, and the parent responding by mocking or belittling the child! Now imagine, if this happens regularly. Not only will the child lose trust in the parent and stop confiding things, he/she will also grow into a vexed and confused personality,” Poddar told IANS.

“This child would not be confident about himself, will have repressed feelings of frustration and in a way will also start normalizing the behaviour of insulting of belittling others. This creates problems with peer adjustment and might lead the child to start victimizing or bullying others. kids develop in response to their environment, therefore, when their environment is toxic or negative, it breeds self-harm,” she added. (IANS)