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Fathers Experience More Happiness Than Mothers in Their Parenthood, Says Study

"Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children," said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US

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Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Fathers experience more well-being and satisfaction than mothers in their parenthood and even when interacting with their children, a new study suggests.

Researchers from the University of California in the US analysed three separate studies consisting of 18,000 people that looked at the scale of happiness, psychological satisfaction, depressive symptoms and stress among others.

The first two studies compared the well-being of parents with that of people who do not have children.

The findings published in the journal “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin”, showed that fathers reported greater satisfaction with their lives and feelings of connectedness to others.

Father and son
Father and son, Pixabay

They also reported greater positive emotions and fewer daily hassles than mothers, or relatives or peers without children.

They even showed fewer depressive symptoms than men without children, whereas mothers reported more depressive symptoms than women who do not have children.

The third study considered parenthood and well-being while engaging in childcare or interacting with children compared to other daily activities.

Men were found to be happier while caring for their children than women suggesting that gender significantly impacted the association between childcare and happiness.

Child, baby, father
A man twirls a young child on a waterfront park as downtown Seattle disappears in a smoky haze behind, Aug. 19, 2018. VOA

In terms of daily interactions also men reported greater happiness.

One possible explanation given said fathers were more likely to indicate they were playing with their children while they were caring for them or interacting with them as compared to the mothers.

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“Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children,” said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US. (IANS)

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Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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breastfeeding
The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

breastfeeding
Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)