Monday June 18, 2018

Father’s stress linked to kids’ brain development

The researchers noted that by learning more about links between a father's exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders

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But, administration of a drug that chemically blocks NkB-specific receptors enabled the stressed mice to behave normally, eliminating the negative effects of social isolation.
Representational image. Wikimedia Commons
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  • According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child
  • Research found that the father’s sperm showed changes in a genetic material known as microRNA

Fathers, take note! Taking too much stress may affect the brain development of your kids, a new study has claimed.

According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child.

This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of their kids, the researchers said.

Previously, the researchers including Tracy Bale at the University of Maryland School found that adult male mice, experiencing chronic periods of mild stress, have offspring with a reduced response to stress; changes in stress reactivity have been linked to some neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and PTSD.

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They isolated the mechanism of the reduced response; they found that the father’s sperm showed changes in a genetic material known as microRNA.

MicroRNA are important because they play a key role in which genes become functional proteins.

According to the researchers, the stress changes the father's sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child.
According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child. Wikimedia Commons

Now, the researchers have unravelled new details about these microRNA changes.

In the male reproductive tract, the caput epididymis, the structure where sperm matures, releases tiny vesicles packed with microRNA that can fuse with sperm to change its cargo delivered to the egg, they said.

The caput epididymis responded to the father’s stress by altering the content of these vesicles, the researchers added.

Also Read: Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

The result of the study, presented at AAAS 2018 annual meeting in Austin, suggests that even mild environmental challenges can have a significant impact on the development and potentially the health of future offspring.

The researchers also noted that by learning more about links between a father’s exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders. (IANS)

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Kids Who Sleep Less Eat More

This is the first study that directly links sleep to energy intake in children under age three

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Kids Who Sleep Less Eat More
Kids Who Sleep Less Eat More. Pixabay

Parents, please take note of your child’s sleeping habit as researchers have now found that children who sleep less tend to eat more which increases risk of obesity and related health problems later in life.

The study found that 16 month-old children who slept for less than 10 hours a day consumed around 10 percent more calories on average than children who slept for more than 13 hours.

“The key message here is that shorter sleeping children may prone to consume too many calories,” said Abi Fisher of the Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

This is the first study that directly links sleep to energy intake in children under age three.

In the study that involved 1,303 British families, researchers monitored sleep when children were 16 months old and diet at 21 months old.

While the exact causes remain unclear, the regulation of appetite hormones may become disrupted by shorter sleeping patterns, the study suggested.

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“Although more research is needed to understand why this might be, it is something parents should be made aware of,” Fisher noted.

The study appeared in the International Journal of Obesity. (Bollywood Country)

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