Monday February 24, 2020

Study Identifies Brain Circuits That Cause Fatty Food Craving

Several behavioural studies have demonstrated that denying certain foods while on a diet causes increased craving and motivation for that food. 

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Study Identifies Brain Circuits That Cause Fatty Food Craving

Do you feel the urge to binge on golden hot chips, cheesy pizza, crispy chicken, heartwarming hamburgers, all when on a diet? Researchers have identified new brain circuits that may act as a brake on binge eating and junk food craving.

In the study, led by a team from the University of Texas at Galveston on rats who had spent a month eating a low-fat diet, the team successfully inhibited the fatty food seeking behaviours.

“Craving for foods high in fat — this includes many junk foods — is an important part of obesity and binge eating,” said Jonathan Hommel, Assistant Professor at the University of Texas in the US.

Cholesterol -- a molecule normally linked with cardiovascular diseases -- may also play an important role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease, researchers have found.
Junk Food is highly rich in Cholesterol, pixabay

“When trying to lose weight people often strive to avoid fatty foods, which ironically increases motivation and craving for these foods and can lead to overeating. Even worse, the longer someone abstains from fatty foods, the greater the cravings,” Hommel added.

Several behavioural studies have demonstrated that denying certain foods while on a diet causes increased craving and motivation for that food.

However, the brain mechanisms that lead to this type of overeating are not known.

For the study, published in the journal Behavioural Brain Research, half of the rats underwent a surgical procedure that blocked the effects of a brain chemical called neuromedin U receptor 2 within a region of the brain that regulates food intake.

When trying to lose weight people often strive to avoid fatty foods, which ironically increases motivation and craving for these foods and can lead to overeating. E    Pixabay
 Researchers have identified new brain circuits that may act as a brake on binge eating and junk food craving. Pixabay

The other half of the rats did not receive this treatment.

Also Read: Avoid High Calories just By Smelling Such Food For Longer Than Two Minutes
After surgical recovery, the rats who had been treated did not work nearly as hard for fatty treats as their unaltered counterparts did.

“While our findings are only the first step in a long process from the scientific lab to the doctor’s office, we are planning to develop new drugs to help curb those cravings,” Hommel said. (IANS)

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Higher Intake of Fruits and Dairy Products Reduces Risk of Stroke: Study

Eat fruits, yoghurt daily to reduce stroke risk

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Dairy products fruits
Higher intakes of fruit, vegetables and dairy products is linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke. Pixabay

Different types of food are linked to risks of different types of stroke, say health and lifestyle researchers, adding that higher intakes of fruit, vegetables and dairy products is linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke.

For the study, published in the European Heart Journal, the researchers picked over 4,18,000 people in nine European countries and investigated ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke separately.

The study found that while higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, fibre, milk, cheese or yoghurt were each linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke, there was no significant association with a lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

Dairy products fruits
Consuming fruits, vegetables and dairy products has an effect on the body cholestrol. Pixabay

However, greater consumption of eggs was associated with a higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, but not with ischaemic stroke, the researchers said.

“Our study also highlights the importance of examining stroke subtypes separately, as the dietary associations differ for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, and is consistent with other evidence, which shows that other risk factors, such as cholesterol levels or obesity, also influence the two stroke subtypes differently,” said study first author Tammy Tong from University of Oxford in the UK.

Ischaemic stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery supplying blood to the brain or forms somewhere else in the body and travels to the brain where it blocks blood flow.

Haemorrhagic stroke occurs when there is bleeding in the brain that damages nearby cells. About 85 per cent of strokes are ischaemic and 15 per cent are haemorrhagic. Stroke is the second leading cause of deaths worldwide.

For the findings, the research team analysed data from 418,329 men and women in nine countries (Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK) who were recruited to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study between 1992 and 2000.

The participants completed questionnaires asking about diet, lifestyle, medical history and socio-demographic factors, and were followed up for an average of 12.7 years.

During this time, there were 4,281 cases of ischaemic stroke and 1,430 cases of haemorrhagic stroke.

Dairy products fruits
Greater consumption of dairy products is associated with a higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, but not with ischaemic stroke. Pixabay

The total amount of fibre (including fibre from fruit, vegetables, cereal, legumes, nuts and seeds) that people ate was associated with the greatest potential reduction in the risk of ischaemic stroke, the researchers said.

Every 10g more intake of fibre a day was associated with a 23 per cent lower risk, which is equivalent to around two fewer cases per 1,000 of the population over 10 years, they added.

Fruit and vegetables alone were associated with a 13 per cent lower risk for every 200g eaten a day, which is equivalent to one less case per 1,000 of the population over 10 years.

No foods were linked to a statistically significant higher risk of ischaemic stroke.

Also Read- Here’s Why You Should Include Walnuts in Your Diet

The researchers found that for every extra 20g of eggs consumed a day there was a 25 per cent higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

The researchers said the associations they found between different foods and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke might be explained partly by the effects on blood pressure and cholesterol. (IANS)