Monday September 23, 2019

FDA indicts Snapdeal for selling prescription drugs; Amazon, Flipkart also ‘under’ scanner

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Rx-Drugs

By NewsGram Staff Writer

In a major crackdown on the sale of prescription drugs online, The Maharashtra Food & Drugs Administration (FDA) has come down heavily upon e-commerce website Snapdeal.

As per FDA Commissioner Harshadeep Kamble the FDA sleuths raided Snapdeal’s office in Goregaon, north-west Mumbai, after a specific tip-off was received that prescription drugs like Ascoril cough syrup, Viagra tablets, and other medicines were being sold online.

The official said that Snapdeal.com has been asked to provide details of the people involved, medical stores, companies, their respective documents including agreements, challans, invoices, payment details etc.

The FDA directive mandates Snapdeal to immediately withdraw offers for sale and exhibition of such drugs from its e-commerce sites and delist them, which the company has agreed to comply with.

The FDA has also ordered a search of Snapdeal’s offices and godowns in this connection.

Responding to the allegations, Snapdeal denied findings of any such restricted products at their fulfillment centre by the FDA team. Snapdeal, however, assured help to the FDA sleuths in their investigations.

An official spokesperson of Snapdeal said, “Though we periodically educate sellers on engaging in fair and safe sales on the platform and consequences of selling inappropriate products, at times sellers end up listing such products.”

“Upon being notified of any such products, we delist the products and take appropriate action against such seller. In this case, upon receiving the notice, we have delisted the products and provided all information to the FDA team”, he further added.

The FDA Commissioner also said that Flipkart and Amazon offices will also be investigated to ascertain whether they are also indulging in such activities, for which details are being sought.

Next Story

FDA Opens Criminal Probe into E-Cigarette-Related Lung Illnesses in United States

There were seven deaths and 530 confirmed or suspected cases of serious illness related to vaping by late Thursday

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FDA, Criminal, E-Cigarette
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, left, and acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless speak with reporters after a meeting about vaping with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House, Sept. 11, 2019, in Washington. VOA

Federal regulators have opened a criminal probe into e-cigarette-related lung illnesses in the United States.

There were seven deaths and 530 confirmed or suspected cases of serious illness related to vaping by late Thursday.

The Food and Drug Administration says it has no intention of prosecuting e-cigarette users, but says its criminal investigations division can help federal authorities figure out why people are getting sick.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging people to stop vaping. But it says no one should go back to smoking tobacco cigarettes, urging smokers to get counseling or use FDA-approved products to stop smoking.

FDA, Criminal, E-Cigarette
Federal regulators have opened a criminal probe into e-cigarette-related lung illnesses in the United States. Pixabay

Health experts have been unable to pinpoint an exact cause of vaping-related lung illnesses, including a specific brand or ingredient in e-cigarettes. But some suspect the use of the marijuana component THC in vaping devices.

E-cigarette devices have been marketed as a safer alternative to tobacco. Federal regulators have warned the largest e-cigarette maker, JUUL, against making such claims, saying they have not been proven.

New York this week became the first state to immediately ban flavored e-cigarettes, saying the fruit and candy flavors used in vaping devices are meant to appeal to young people.

Also Read- 3 Billion Fewer Birds in United States, Canada and Mexico than 1970

Only tobacco and menthol flavors can be sold in New York. Michigan has also approved a ban on flavors, but it has not taken effect yet. Other states are also considering a ban. (VOA)