Thursday November 23, 2017

Feeding cow’s milk to toddlers below 1 year is harmful to them, says Experts

Feeding Cow's milk to toddlers below one year can lead to allergic diseases

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Feeding cow's milk to toddlers below 1 year is harmful
Feeding cow's milk to toddlers below 1 year is harmful. Pixabay
  • Though cow’s milk is associated with our culture for ages, it should not be given to toddlers below one year
  • Cow’s Milk may put a strain on the infant’s immature kidney and is also difficult to digest
  • Only 40 % of children were introduced timely complementary foods, while only 10 % children between six to 23 months received adequate diets

New Delhi, September 10, 2017: Feeding cow’s milk to toddlers below the age of one year is a growing factor behind allergic diseases, including in the respiratory and digestive system, as they cannot tolerate the protein in the milk, experts said on Sunday.

Stating that infants who do not get breast milk need an alternate form of nutrition to maintain their health, the child experts said if cow’s milk is fed at such an initial age then the low concentration of iron and its consumption during infancy is linked to anemia.

“Though cow’s milk is associated with our culture for ages, it should not be given to toddlers below one year… It may put a strain on the infant’s immature kidney and is also difficult to digest,” said Nandan Joshi, Health and Nutrition Science, Danone India.

While older infants can be fed with household complimentary food, younger ones need special hydrolyzed and amino acid-based formula which does not produce allergy.

As per the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), only 40 per cent of children were introduced timely complementary foods, while only 10 per cent children between six to 23 months received adequate diets.

The infants are given cow milk in India as awareness is low among the people, especially in rural areas.

As per the Rapid Survey on Children (RSOC), 42 per cent of nonbreastfed infants below one year received cow’s milk or any other milk.

“Allergic diseases are on the rise worldwide. The incidents are more in developed countries though it is on the rise in India as well. Milk allergy is the most common allergy in children,” said Lalit Bharadia, Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist at Jaipur’s Santokba Durlabhji Memorial Hospital.

“Around 3 per cent of children can’t tolerate milk protein in animal milk. Milk allergic infants, who do not get breast milk, need an alternate form of nutrition to maintain their health.”

Durlabhji said that while older infants can be fed with household complimentary food, younger ones need special hydrolyzed and amino acid-based formula which does not produce allergy.

“Such products are easily available in India.”

Allergy is a result of one or more cow’s milk proteins triggering an adverse reaction by our body’s immune system.

The symptoms vary and may affect several organ systems such as skin, digestive or the respiratory tract, possibly resulting in skin rash, eczema, vomiting, diarrhoea, colic, wheezing or excessive crying.

In a study conducted at a tertiary care hospital in India, three out of 10 children with chronic diarrhoea were estimated to be suffering from cow’s milk allergy. Globally, the prevalence rate of cow’s milk allergy is approximately 3 to 5 per cent. (IANS)

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Love Hot Served Food? Caution: These 10 Foods May Turn Toxic Upon Reheating

Here is the rundown of 10 foods that you ought to abstain from reheating to keep its supplements rich

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Reheating some food may be dangerous to health. Pixabay

Sep 01, 2017: Food function as the fuel for your body and you should put every effort to have a robust and healthy food. The foods you devour include supplements, vitamins, fiber, protein, and minerals, which combine to help your body keep going.

Many of us indulge in the practice of reheating the food while eating. But few nourishments could transform into dangerous components in the wake of reheating. The reality will astound you, however, don’t stress.

Here is the rundown of 10 foods that you ought to abstain from reheating to keep its nutrients rich.

1. Rice

Rice. Pixabay

Most of you store rice in the wrong way, which in turn, can be toxic. The spores available in the raw rice can turn into bacteria, which multiply at the room temperature and may induce diarrhea and vomiting.

2. Potatoes

Potatoes. Pixabay

Potatoes are the favorite for many of us, but shockingly, potatoes lose their nutritional value when reheated. Toxic potatoes can breed illness, nausea, and induce food poisoning.

3. Spinach

Spinach. Pixabay

Just like any other green leafy vegetable, Spinach is rich in iron and nitrates. Upon reheating it, the nitrates turn into nitrites which can lead to cancer in living tissue.

4. Oils

Olive Oil. Pixabay

Some oils such as grape seed oil, walnut oil, flaxseed oil, hazelnut oil, and avocado oil have extremely low smoke limits.If you reheat them, they become unhealthy to devour.

Also Read: List of 8 Food Items to Battle Depression and Anxiety 

5. Egg

Egg. Pixabay

Reheating eggs at high temperature makes them poisonous and upon devouring them, your digestive system may fall sick.

6. Chicken

Fried Chicken. Pixabay

Chicken, the rich source of protein also create a negative impact after reheating. Eating such chicken may become a problem for you.

7. Turnips

Turnips. Pixabay

Turnips contain nitrates which can become toxic for health if reheated. Ordinarily, turnips are used in preparing soups.

8. Mushrooms

Mushrooms. Pixabay

Here is one thing about Mushroom, everyone should know: It should be utilized on the same day they are cooked, as they are a rich source of protein. Mushrooms upon reheating may change its structure which can be harmful to your body and causes severe heart problems.

9. Beets

Beetroot. Pixabay

Beets also include a high proportion of nitrates, which upon reheating can turn into nitrites and can prove to be problematic for your health.

10. Celery

Celery. Pixabay

Celery also carries a high rate of nitrate. It turns into nitrites after reheating, which increases the risk of methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder.


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Swine Flu Guide: All You Need to Know about the Global Pandemic Disease!

Around 8,648 Swine Flu cases were reported and 345 deaths were caused by Swine Flu till May 7, 2017

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Symptoms of Swine Flu
Symptoms of Swine Flu. Wikimedia
  • Swine flu is a disease that attacks the respiratory tract of pigs, is caused by influenza viruses
  • The first time when Swine Flu was identified in humans was in the year 2009 in Mexico
  • Consult your doctor if you think you are at a higher risk of acquiring this infection

New Delhi (India), Aug 22, 2017: Swine Flu can get transferred from one person to another. Thus, it creates a panic situation whenever a single person is infected with this disease. To avoid catching this disease we can take some precautions.

As per the data from the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare India- there has been 8,648 Swine Flu cases and 345 deaths caused by this disease till May 7, 2017. There were 1,786 Swine Flu cases and 265 deaths caused by it in 2016. Till May 7, Tamil Nadu alone has had 2,798 cases of it, 181 and 130 people suffered at the hands of this disease in Maharashtra and Gujarat respectively.  The worst years for Swine Flu outbreak in India were 2009-10 when it affected almost 50,000 people and took more than 2,700 lives across the country.

According to ANI report, some important guidelines on diagnosis of  Swine Flu are given below. We have also mentioned the steps one should take if they catch Swine Flu and other crucial pointers which you don’t want to miss.

What is Swine Flu?

Swine flu is a disease that attacks the respiratory tract of pigs, is caused by influenza viruses. The symptoms shown by an infected animal are barking cough, decreased appetite, listless behavior and nasal secretions. The virus can mutate and get easily transmissible in humans.

Also Read: 40 swine flu cases in Delhi already in 2016

Where did it originate from?

The first time when Swine Flu was identified in humans was in the year 2009 in Mexico. After a few months, the very first of the swine flu cases were reported; slowly the rate, at which H1N1-related illness started spreading, was increasing around the globe. As a result, in August 2010 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the infection ‘a global pandemic’ (a disease prevalent all over the world).

Even now, H1N1 has not stopped spreading is still getting circulated in humans, as a ‘seasonal flu virus’ and protection against this strain was thus included in seasonal flu vaccines. More recently, another strain, H3N2 infected humans in 2011.

What is the time period till this disease lasts?

Generally, the incubation period of a swine flu virus is between 3 to 7 days but if one catches a serious infection it can last about 9 or even 10 days.

What are the symptoms?

H1N1 flu symptoms take some time to develop, it takes around 1 to 3 days in humans. This is after they are exposed to the virus.

Some Common symptoms are:

  • Body Ache
  • In some cases Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Watery or red eyes
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • vomiting

Also Read: Are you safe? Swine Flu virus mutates in India, becomes more lethal, says MIT study

Is Vaccination possible and available?

If you want to reduce the risk of contracting the influenza virus, it can be done through vaccinations. Consult your doctor if you think you are at a higher risk of acquiring this infection. The need to get vaccinated increases if one is traveling to a place where many cases have been recently reported.

The High-risk groups are:

  • Children: who are younger than 5 yrs of age, especially those who are younger than 2 yrs
  • Senior citizens: Those 65 years and older
  • Pregnant women: who are within 2 weeks of delivery, including those women who have had a miscarriage
  • Chronic Medical Conditions: People suffering from it. Chronic Medical Conditions like heart disease, diabetes asthma, kidney, liver or blood disease, emphysema and neuromuscular disease
  • Those who are immunosuppressed (reduction of the activation or efficacy of the immune system) due to some particular medications or because of HIV

How to get it Diagnosed?

If you want to get it diagnosed, it can be done by taking a nose or throat swab. This should be done within the first 5 days of the illness, this being the most infectious period of the disease. Only a few labs are authorized to conduct Swine Flu tests. The Swab results take 8 to 24 hours, after seeing the results and consulting the doctor, the patient will know if he/she has this disease. Some labs are well equipped with a skilled technician if you prefer a home collection of the sample. “The expert team of pathologists is also able to guide clinicians and patients for report analysis and queries surrounding swine flu diagnosis,” mentions ANI report.

Apart from taking vaccines and getting tested for Swine Flu. One of the easiest ways to prevent catching swine flu is by maintaining a basic hygiene routine which includes washing your hands on a regular basis.

 

NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.
Click here- www.newsgram.com/donate

 

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Why More than 580 Million People in India Have Poor Healthcare?

The maternal mortality ratio -- deaths of mothers per 100,000 births -- in these states is 32 per cent higher (244) than the national average (167)

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Healthcare
Healthcare in India. Pixabay
  • India’s average spending on health, as a proportion of GDP, is already the lowest among BRICS nations
  • It accounts for 70 percent of the country’s infant deaths, 75 percent of under-five deaths and 62 per cent of maternal deaths

July 07, 2017: Nine of India’s poorest states — home to 581 million or 48 percent of the population — account for 70 percent of the country’s infant deaths, 75 percent of under-five deaths and 62 per cent of maternal deaths, but do not spend even the money they have set aside for healthcare, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of 2017 Reserve Bank of India data on state budgets.

The data also reveal:

— The maternal mortality ratio — deaths of mothers per 100,000 births — in these states is 32 percent higher (244) than the national average (167).

— 38 per cent and 40 per cent children in these states are underweight (low weight-for-age) and stunted (low height-for-age), respectively, higher than the national average of 36 per cent and 38 per cent, respectively, according to 2015-16 national health data, the latest available.

— Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan — with 372 million people, more than the combined populations of US, Australia, Sweden, and Greece –together contribute to about 58 percent of all child deaths in India.

The nine poorest large states — in official jargon called “high-focus”, a term that implies they need special attention — spent an average of 4.7 percent of their social sector expenditure on public health care and family welfare annually, marginally less than the national average of 4.8 percent. Social sector expenditure includes water supply and sanitation, housing and urban development.

India’s average spending on health, as a proportion of GDP, is already the lowest among BRICS nations.

The “high-focus” states are Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh and Assam.

“In 2005, it was observed by (the) Government of India that some states were performing poorly in various indicators,” Avani Kapur, Senior Researcher, Accountability Initiative, an advocacy, told IndiaSpend. “So, these states were clubbed together as high-focus states and additional resources were given to improve those indicators.”

ALSO READ: “Dual-Disease Burden”? India’s Great Healthcare Challenge and Opportunity 

Of the nine poorest states, Rajasthan spent the highest (5.6 percent) and Bihar the lowest (3.8 percent) proportion of aggregate expenditure on public health care and family welfare, according to the RBI data on 2014-15 actual spending, lower than the budgeted 4.1 percent for Bihar and 6.6 per cent for Rajasthan.

Seven of the nine “high-focus” states report such underspending.

“High focus states allocate large amounts to social sector to improve their indicators but in reality, they spend only a small amount, compared to what is allotted,” Kapur said. “Hence, it is necessary to consider actual accounts in order to know the proper outcomes.”

So, while some “high-focus” states spent less money than set aside by their budgets, other states outspent — by proportion as ratio to aggregate expenditure — other larger states on healthcare and family welfare, but that had no relation to their healthcare indicators.

For instance, Rajasthan (68.6 million people) reported an MMR of 244 deaths per 100,000 births in 2011-13, the second lowest in India and worse off than Bangladesh and Nepal, both poorer countries, by per capita income. In contrast, Andhra Pradesh (84.6 million people), another big state, spent 4.1 per cent of total expenditure on public healthcare and family welfare but reported an MMR of 92, according to government data.

Since 2008, Rajasthan increased its spending by 0.8 per cent and its MMR decreased 23 per cent while Andhra Pradesh’s spending increased by 0.5 per cent and MMR decreased 31 per cent.

Assam, which spends 4.2 per cent of its total expenditure on health and has 31.2 million people, has an MMR of 300 deaths per 100,000 births — comparable to Rwanda and Sudan — while Kerala, which spends 5.3 per cent on 33.4 million, reported an MMR of 61, comparable to Sri Lanka and Poland.

Madhya Pradesh, which reported an infant mortality rate (IMR) — deaths per 1,000 live births — of 51 in 2015-16, spends 4.3 per cent of total expenditure on healthcare (against the budgeted 5 per cent) and is worse off than some of the world’s poorest countries, such as the Gambia and Ethiopia.

In the nine “high-focus” states, 72.6 per cent of all births were in healthcare institutions, a steady improvement but below the national average of 78.9 per cent, according to the 2015-16 National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4) data, the latest available.

Promoting community-based education on improved maternal and newborn care, and home-based treatment for newborn infections could enhance child survival in the “high- focus” states “significantly”, said a 2012 PLOS-ONE study. (IANS)