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Fethullah Gulen Denies Any Involvement With the Bloody Militant Coup in Turkey

Fethullah Gulen is the self-exiled Muslim cleric living in U.S. and the founder of the Hizmet Movement.

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Fethullah Gulen. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons
  • Fethullah Gulen is the founder of the Hizmet Movement which preaches co-existence and co-operation in the terms of Sunni Islam.
  • Gulen lives in the U.S. and his movement is active in parts of U.S, Europe, Asia and Africa.
  • In spite of being repeatedly accused of the recent militant coup in Turkey, Gulen maintains his position on the matter, that, he or his followers were not involved in any way and they condemn the attack.
President Erdogan. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons
President Erdogan. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons

While Turkey reels under the aftermath of the Militant Coup, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is blaming the coup on Fethullah Gulen, the Muslim Cleric who lives in Pennsylvania.

However, Gulen has denied all the accusations saying that, “As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having link to any such an attempt.  I categorically deny such accusations”.

In fact, Gulen has strongly condemned the attack and has clearly mentioned that he or his followers can never bear any association with such activities.

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Initially when Erdogan became the President, Gulen was one of his biggest supporters. But in 2013, Gulen, along with police and investigators launched a corruption probe against Erdogan’s inner circle. That is when Erdogan left Turkey and settled in the United States under the garb of a self-exile. Then on, he has seldom appeared before the media. However, his supporters are still in Turkey and seem to have raised a lot of fund for their movement.

Gulen with Pope John Paul II. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons
Gulen with Pope John Paul II. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons

Gulen’s movement is called ‘Hizmet’ which means service. Gulen preaches  Sunni Islam together with a message of interfaith dialogue. It is an amalgamation of Sufi mysticism and harmony among people. However, Hizmet is not a religious movement. It is essentially about co-existence and co-operation among people. Gulen’s movement centres around U.S., Africa , Europe and Asia.

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According to the Alliance for Shared Values, “For more than 40 years. Fethullah Gulen and Hizmet participants have advocated for and demonstrated their commitment to, peace and democracy”.

This has strengthened Gulen’s claims of not being involved in the coup. He said, “ I pray to God for Turkey, for Turkish citizens, and for all those currently in Turkey that this situation is resolved peacefully and quickly”.

Prepared by NewsGramTeam

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S.Korea Removes N.Korea As Its ‘Enemy’ In Its Military Policy Document

The Defense Ministry says North Korea maintains an active duty force of 1.28 million troops, compared with the South’s 599,000 active duty troops.

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Korea, Enemy
South and North Korean officials unveil the sign of Seoul to Pyeongyang during a groundbreaking ceremony for the reconnection of railways and roads at the Panmun Station in Kaesong, North Korea, Dec. 26, 2018. VOA

South Korea has dropped a reference to North Korea as its “enemy” in the military’s updated policy document, reflecting President Moon Jae-in’s initiative in achieving détente with Pyongyang.

The Defense Ministry has labeled the North as enemy in its biennial policy document since 2010, when 50 South Koreans were killed in separate attacks on an island and a naval vessel blamed on Pyongyang.

The absence of the “enemy” label in the 2018 document, published Tuesday, is likely to anger conservatives in South Korea, who say that President Moon’s efforts to build better relations with the regime of Kim Jong Un is undermining the South’s defense posture.

Korea, Enemy
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in inside the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, April 27, 2018. VOA

Kim’s New Year’s Day speech in 2017 offering to send a contingent of North Korean athletes to the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in South Korea set off a series of diplomatic breakthroughs, including three summits with President Moon.

The newly established diplomatic ties have also led to a set of confidence-building measures, including dismantling dozens of all armed guard posts and landmines in the so-called Joint Security Area located within the 250-kilometer demilitarized zone (DMZ), where troops from both Koreas are face to face.

The South Korean Defense Ministry paper warns that North Korea’s weapons of mass destruction, a reference to its nuclear and missile program, continues to pose a “threat to peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.”

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The Defense Ministry says North Korea maintains an active duty force of 1.28 million troops, compared with the South’s 599,000 active duty troops. The regime either possesses or is developing 14 different types of ballistic missiles, including five intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) with a range of more than 5,500 kilometers. The North also owns “a considerable amount” of highly enriched uranium, along with 50 kilograms of weaponized plutonium. (VOA)