Thursday June 21, 2018

Finally The Cause Of Depression Among Diabetes Patients Discovered

The research showed that higher levels of galectin-3 -- an inflammatory protein -- is the culprit.

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Increased levels of a protein inflammation in the body may be the reason behind depression — a mental health disorder characterised by persistently depressed mood or loss of interest in activities — among people with Type-1 diabetes, according to researchers.

It is well established that people with both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing depression, but the causes remain poorly understood.

The research showed that higher levels of galectin-3 — an inflammatory protein — is the culprit.

Galectin-3 is a key protein involved in promoting inflammatory immune system responses that are needed to repair tissue damage throughout the body, in response to injury or disease.

Depression
Depression, flickr

According to the researchers, galectin-3 — also linked with Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular diseases — may be useful for diagnosis of depression or maybe a new target for treating depression associated with Type-1 diabetes, which could lead to better patient care.

“We found that people with Type-1 diabetes and depression had higher galectin-3 levels, yet no other diabetes-related metabolic changes could account for these elevated levels,” said Eva Olga Melin from Lund University, Sweden.

The study, published in the journal Endocrine Connections, analysed data on measurements of galectin-3 levels in 283 people, aged between 18-59 years, with Type-1 diabetes for a year.

The results showed that both men and women with Type-1 diabetes and depression also had significantly higher galectin-3 levels.

Also read: Wife’s BMI Mens risk of developing diabetes

“…these findings suggest that further investigating the role of galectin-3 could lead to improved diagnosis and maybe better treatment outcomes for patients in the future,” Melin said.(IANS)

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients
Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients. Pixabay

Plant-based diets can be beneficial for diabetes as a new study has found that it may improve glycemic control, cholesterol and lead to weight loss in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The researchers suggest that plant-based diets benefit both glycemic control and cardiovascular health because they are low in saturated fat, rich in phytochemicals, high in fibre and often rich in low-glycemic fruits and vegetables.

“The link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease is strong. 60-70 per cent of people who have Type 2 diabetes die of heart disease,” said co-author Hana Kahleova, Director of Clinical Research at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington DC.

“The good news is that this study shows that the same simple prescription — eating a plant-based diet — can reduce our risk for heart problems and improve Type 2 diabetes at the same time,” Kahleova added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes.

For the study, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition, the researchers reviewed nine randomised controlled trials — nearly 700 participants — that assessed the effectiveness of vegan and vegetarian diets for diabetes patients.

Also Read: Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From ‘Surgery in a Pill’

The results suggested that those who ate a plant-based diet lowered their cholesterol, lost weight, lowered HbA1c levels, and improved other cardiometabolic risk factors when compared to those who ate a non-vegetarian diet.

There was no significant effect on fasting insulin, HDL-C, triglycerides or blood pressure. The overall certainty of evidence was moderate but was low for fasting insulin, triglycerides, and waist circumference. (IANS)