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First Modern Indian Scientist: Google Doodle marks Remarkable Contributions of Jagadish Chandra Bose on 158th Birthday

Some scientists even believe that Bose was the real inventor of wireless, not Guglielmo Marconi

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Google Doodle

New Delhi, Nov 30, 2016: Google has celebrated the remarkable contributions of scientist Jagadish Chandra Bose, pioneer of electro-magnetic waves and inventor of an early version of wireless telecommunication, with a doodle on Wednesday — on what would be his 158th birthday.

Widely regarded as the first modern Indian scientist, Bose was born in 1858 at Munshiganj of then Bengal Presidency of British India, now in Bangladesh.

“Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose was a master of scientific achievement with numerous accomplishments in various fields,” Google said in a statement.

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“Bose was to become known not only for his work in biophysics, but also his innovation in the world of radio and microwave sciences, ultimately inventing an early version of wireless telecommunication,” it added.

Some scientists even believe that Bose was the real inventor of wireless, not Guglielmo Marconi.

Acharya Jagdish Chandra Bose, Wikimedia
Acharya Jagdish Chandra Bose, Wikimedia

In 1895 in Calcutta, he publicly demonstrated wireless transmission of electromagnetic waves for the first time anywhere in the world, using the waves to ring a distant bell and thereby to explode some gunpowder, according to a biography at Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, where he studied natural sciences.

The Daily Chronicle of England noted in 1896 that “The inventor (J.C. Bose) has transmitted signals to a distance of nearly a mile and herein lies the first and obvious and exceedingly valuable application of this new theoretical marvel”, Google added.

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Bose’s investigations into nature included the invention of the crescograph — an instrument that measures movement and growth in plant life by magnifying it 10,000 times, Google said.

He went on to demonstrate the similarities between animals and plants, particularly when it came to reactions to different environmental, electrical, and chemical influences. (IANS)

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Google Doodle Celebrates Earth Day with Series of Animations on Six Unique Inhabitants on Earth

The theme of this year's Earth Day was 'Protect Our Species' and intended to draw attention to the rapid global destruction and reduction of the world's plant and wildlife populations

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google doodle, earth day
The theme of this year's Earth Day was 'Protect Our Species' and intended to draw attention to the rapid global destruction and reduction of the world's plant and wildlife populations. Wikimedia

From Wandering Albatross to Coastal Redwood, Google on Monday celebrated Earth Day with a series of animations on six unique inhabitants on the Earth.

While Wandering Albatross has the widest wingspan in the world, Coastal Redwood is the tallest tree in the world at 377 feet.

Paedophryne Amauensis is a species of frog from Papua New Guinea. At 7.7 mm in length, it is considered the world’s smallest known vertebrate.

earth day, google doodle
FILE – An environmental militant shows an orange, painted as a globe, during an event to mark the Earth Overshoot Day on Aug. 1, 2018 in Berlin. It marks the date when we (all of humanity) have used more from nature than our planet can renew in the entire year. VOA

Another animation is on Amazon Water Lily which is the largest aquatic plant.

Then there is Coelacanth — a fish that was long considered a “living fossil”. It evolved into roughly its current form approximately 400 million years ago.

Several recent studies have shown that Coelacanth body shapes are much more diverse than previously thought.

google doodle, earth day
Google Doodle marks 6 unique inhabitants on Earth Day. VOA

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The last animation is on “Deep Cave Springtail”, insects that live in total darkness in caves where they feed on fungi and decomposing organic matter.

The theme of this year’s Earth Day was ‘Protect Our Species’ and intended to draw attention to the rapid global destruction and reduction of the world’s plant and wildlife populations. (IANS)