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First Ship With Goods Cleared Under iCMS Arrives at the Port of Mombasa

Integrated Customs Management System (iCMS) Sea cargo regime goes live in Mombasa, Kenya

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Integrated Customs Management System (iCMS) clears its first assignment in Mombasa. Pixabay

By Geoffrey Isaya

The Integrated Customs Management System (iCMS) Sea cargo regime has gone live at the Port of Mombasa with the clearing of the first consignment of 43,400.835 metric tonnes of clinker.

The Vessel transporting the consignment, MV Ptolomeos, docked at the Port of Mombasa at 6.25 a.m. on Tuesday, 15th August 2019 and was offloaded to its destination.

The consignment was cleared automatically in the system, after the importer’s clearing agent, Express Shipping and Logistics (ESL), lodged entries in the system and paid duty of Ksh. 65 million before the arrival of the cargo.

The next bulk consignments to be cleared through iCMS are 42,000 metric tonnes of clinker and 25,540 metric tonnes of coal. The former arrived at the Port of Mombasa on 7th August onboard MV Boreas Venture and the latter is expected to arrive on 21st August by MV African Hoeg respectively.

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iCMS and its clearance module has been implemented in phases. Pixabay

The clinker consignment which is still in high seas was cleared pre-arrival following the lodging of entry and payment of duty of Ksh. 62,657,000.

The coal importer, Riftcot Limited, has initiated the cargo clearance process by registering an import declaration form (IDF) to have the cargo released through the system. KRA expects to collect revenue of more than Ksh. 40 million from the consignment.

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Clearance of cargo through the new system is a major milestone for efforts by Kenya Revenue Authority to expedite Customs clearance of cargo and enhance trade facilitation. iCMS will reduce the cargo dwell time for compliant imports at the Port of Mombasa since the system does not require human intervention at the document processing centre, unlike the Simba system.

iCMS has been implemented in phases. The clearance module for air cargo went live on 10th May 2019, while the rollout for land and sea cargo began on 7th July 2019.

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Kenya Vows to Cut Emissions as Cooking with Traditional Fuels Kills More than 21,500 Each Year

The health risks were greatest in rural areas, where 90% of households use wood stoves, compared to 70% nationwide, Kenya's first household survey

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Kenya, Emissions, Fuels
A trailer drives along the main Nairobi/Mombasa highway past sacks of charcoal, used for domestic cooking in many Kenyan homes, in Kibwezi. June 20, 2014. VOA

More than 21,500 Kenyans die each year from cooking with traditional fuels like charcoal and firewood, new government data showed on Tuesday, as authorities pledged to meet a global goal of universal access to clean cooking energy by 2030. Kenya.

The health risks were greatest in rural areas, where 90% of households use wood stoves, compared to 70% nationwide, Kenya’s first household survey on energy usage in cooking by the energy ministry and the Clean Cooking Association of Kenya found.

It also found that 80% of households relied solely on either charcoal or firewood as their primary cooking fuel, with 68 billion shillings ($660 million) of charcoal consumed each year.

Kenya’s energy minister Charles Keter said the situation was “grave” and called for more focus on providing clean energy options, such as gas and electricity, to the poor.

Kenya, Emissions, Fuels
FILE -Women walk out of the forest carrying wood to use for cooking, in Tsavo East, in Kenya, June 20, 2014. VOA

“This data underlines the great exposure to harmful pollutants which account for about over 21,560 deaths annually,” he said, launching the survey at a conference on clean cooking.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says 3 billion people globally cook with solid fuels such as charcoal and coal on open fires or traditional stoves, producing high levels of carbon monoxide, which kills about four million people a year.

Countries have committed to ensure universal access to clean, modern energy for cooking by the year 2030 as part of 17 global development goals, but low levels of investment in the clean cooking sector are hindering progress.

The widespread use of dirty fuels also contributes to climate change and deforestation, according to energy experts.

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Government officials said Kenya has committed to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30% — where clean cooking will account for about 14% — under the Paris agreement on climate change, and it hopes to meet this target by 2028. (VOA)