Wednesday September 19, 2018

Being Fit in Middle-age May Not Offer You Protection From The Risk of CVD

Moreover, it is also important to practice moderation when it comes to exercise, Morrison noted

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Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay
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While a lot of middle-aged adults have begun exercising, after realising its potential health benefits, new research claims that even the fittest among them are not immune to cardiovascular disease (CVD)– and they often do not have any symptoms.

The study, from the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada, highlights how important it is for middle-aged adults to have their doctor check their CVD risk factors, especially if they have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or a family history of CVD.

CVD refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke.

“We all know that exercise is good for us–it can help prevent a range of health problems and diseases, from cancer to depression,” said lead author Barbara Morrison, doctoral student at the UBC.

“However, even if you are really active, our findings suggest that you still can’t outrun your risk factors,” she added.

heart-rate
Heart Rate. (IANS)

For the study, published in the journal BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, the team followed 798 “masters athletes” — adults aged 35 and older who engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity — running to cycling, rowing and hockey — at least three days a week.

Of the 798 athletes, 94 (11 per cent) were found to have significant CVD. Ten participants were found to have severe coronary artery disease — a blockage in their artery of 70 per cent or greater — despite not having any symptoms.

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While the results may seem alarming, Morrison emphasised that it does not mean middle-aged adults should stop exercising.

Moreover, it is also important to practice moderation when it comes to exercise, Morrison noted.

“There is no evidence that pushing exercise to the limit will make you live longer or your heart stronger, but when taken to the extreme, it may have the potential to do harm,” said Morrison. (IANS)

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Aspirin Doesn’t Prevent Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases, says Study

McNeil said aspirin remains a relatively safe medication but more research was needed to investigate the longer-term benefits and risks of its daily use

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Aspirin
Aspirin pills are arranged on a counter in New York, Aug. 23, 2018. New studies find most people won't benefit from taking daily low-dose aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. (VOA)

Australia’s largest clinical trial has concluded that taking a daily dose of aspirin does not reduce the chance of death, disability or cardiovascular disease, the results of a five-year study revealed on Monday.

Led by researchers at Monash University and involving more than 19,000 participants, the study known as Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE), did reveal a slightly increased risk of major bleeding problems, reports Xinhua news agency.

Head of Monash University’s Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, John McNeil said that the trial was long overdue and he hopes that the results will help inform prescribing doctors who have long been uncertain whether to recommend the drug to otherwise healthy patients.

“Despite the fact that aspirin has been around for more than 100 years, we have not known whether healthy older people should take it as a preventive measure to keep them healthy for longer,” McNeil said.

Aspirin
Aspirin doesn’t reduce heart attack risk: Australian study. Pixabay

“Aspirin is the most widely used of all preventive drugs and an answer to this question is long overdue — ASPREE has provided this answer.”

Aside from the risk of major bleeding problems which rose from 2.8 to 3.8 per cent, no other significant differences were observed between the placebo group and those taking the aspirin.

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Researchers have noted that the results only apply to those over 70 years of age who are otherwise healthy and not to those with existing conditions such as a previous heart attack, angina or stroke, where aspirin is recommended as a valuable preventive drug.

McNeil said aspirin remains a relatively safe medication but more research was needed to investigate the longer-term benefits and risks of its daily use. (IANS)

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