Wednesday December 11, 2019

Improving Fitness can Help You Cut Cancer Risk

Those in the highest fitness category had a 77 per cent decreased risk of developing lung cancer and 61 per cent decreased risk of developing colorectal cancer

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

While a high fitness level is already known to have a positive impact on conditions like heart disease, a new study suggests that adults who are more fit have the lowest risk of developing lung and colorectal cancer compared with those who have low fitness levels.

For the study, the research team examined 49,143 adults who underwent exercise stress testing from 1991-2009 and followed them for a median of 7.7 years.

Those in the highest fitness category had a 77 per cent decreased risk of developing lung cancer and 61 per cent decreased risk of developing colorectal cancer, the results showed.

women live longer
Women participate in a fitness class lead by Kira Stokes, right, at NYSC Lab in New York, May 11, 2017. VOA

The study, published in the journal Cancer, showed that among individuals who developed lung cancer, those with the highest fitness had a 44 per cent decreased risk of dying during follow-up, and among adults who developed colorectal cancer, those with the highest fitness had an 89 per cent decreased risk.

“Our findings are one of the first, largest, and most diverse cohorts to look at the impact of fitness on cancer outcomes,” said Catherine Handy Marshall, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University in the US.

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“Fitness testing is commonly done today for many people in conjunction with their doctors. Many people might already have these results and can be informed about the association of fitness with cancer risk in addition to what fitness levels mean for other conditions, like heart disease,” Marshall added. (IANS)

Next Story

Light Alcohol Consumption Might Also Increase Cancer Risk: Study

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption

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Alcohol
A light level of Alcohol Consumption at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed. Pixabay

If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light Alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk.

In the study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said one of the researchers Masayoshi Zaitsu from The University of Tokyo. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk,” Zaitsu said.

The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. The data was gathered from 33 general hospitals in Japan.

All participants reported their average daily amount of standardised alcohol units and the duration of drinking.

One standardised drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-ml cup of Japanese sake, one 500-ml bottle of beer, one 180-ml glass of wine, or one 60-ml cup of whiskey.

Alcohol
If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light Alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk. Pixabay

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption.

A light level of drinking at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed.

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Those who drank two or fewer drinks a day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviours and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns. (IANS)