Friday April 19, 2019
Home India These 8 Simpl...

These 8 Simple Techniques Will Flourish Your Garden This Monsoon

Monsoon is the fast paced season with July being an active month which is the time to sow, plant, re – pot, disseminate divide and to de – weed

0
//
Monsoon, Garden Lovers
With Monsoon hailing the vicinity and landscapes thriving with greenery, it is the best time of the year for garden lovers

July 1, 2017: With Monsoon hailing the vicinity and landscapes thriving with greenery, it is the best time of the year for garden lovers for planting and re – potting. The monsoon season usually starts from the month of July, increases the density in August and starts to lessen in September.

Monsoon is the fast paced season with July being an active month which is the time to sow, plant, re – pot, disseminate divide and to de – weed.

Harpreet Ahluwalia of Earthly Creations tells some important tips for Monsoon gardening for the greenery and gardening lovers to take care of their plants·

  • Attention should be given to plants in pots and beds. Plants should be kept free from any standing water and should not stagnate and block the soil.
  • Flower beds must be raised so that water flows down but let the moisture stay.
  • Humid weather brings in prolific growth of weeds and thus constant de – weeding is an important practice for this season.
  • Pruning right before the monsoon helps in faster growth of plants and ensures air and sunlight supply to every part of the plant
  • Dead growth encourages plants to throw fresh shoots and thus must be removed
  • Extra care of plants in monsoon along with weeds should be given as this is the breeding period of insects and worms. Some are good also but at times can damage the plant.
  • As monsoon is good for roses and annuals like balsam, zinnia, cosmos, celosia, and palms, it is tough on chrysanthemums, mother plants and succulents and cacti.
  • Clear rain water by bringing non -chlorinated water which is important for the growth of the plants

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter: @Nainamishr94

Next Story

An ‘Underwater Garden’ Gets Revealed In Australia

The research teams also saw images of the lasting damage inflicted on the ocean-floor by fishing crews.

0
australia, underwater
A man snorkels in an area called the "Coral Gardens" near Lady Elliot Island, on the Great Barrier Reef, off Queensland, Australia, June 11, 2015. Scientists recently found similar-looking coral reefs in much deeper water off Tasmania. VOA

Scientists have discovered a colorful “underwater garden” at depths of up to 2 kilometers during a recent research voyage south of Tasmania in Australia.

The researchers used special cameras to probe 45 undersea mountains, finding more than 100 unnamed species of corals, lobsters and mollusks. The expedition also discovered bioluminescent squids, deep-water sharks and basketwork eels.

Experts spent a month onboard the research vessel Investigator, which is operated by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, or the CSIRO. It is an independent Australian government agency responsible for scientific research.

Scientists have been exploring the Tasmanian cluster of ridges known as seamounts in Australia’s Tasman Fracture and Huon marine parks.

The Great Barrier Reef, Sharks, underwater
Agincourt Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Flickr

The coral they found is soft, which means it is different from the coral in a tropical reef.

The expedition’s chief scientist is Alan Williams from the CSIRO.

“Quite amazingly at these kinds of depths there are coral reefs that in many ways look similar to the kinds of reefs you see in shallow tropical areas, and so what we were seeing on our screens delivered in real time from the cameras were just absolutely fantastic images of these extensive, delicate, colorful and very rich coral reef systems,” he said.

Also Read: Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Coral Bleaching worsens due to widespread damages caused by warmer Ocean Temperatures

The research teams also saw images of the lasting damage inflicted on the ocean-floor by fishing crews. Trawl fishing was banned in the 1990s but much of the region’s coral is still to fully recover.

Experts say science knows more about the surface of the moon than it does about the deep sea. Despite their research south of Tasmania, they still do not understand why bright corals can survive in a pitch-black world far beneath the surface of the ocean. (VOA)