Monday January 20, 2020

Flu Vaccines Reduce Death Rates For BP Patients

Influenza vaccination in patients with high blood pressure is associated with 18 per cent reduced risk of death during the flu season

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Flu Vaccine, Death, BP patient
influenza vaccination may improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with hypertension. Pixabay

Influenza vaccination in patients with high blood pressure is associated with 18 per cent reduced risk of death during the flu season, according to a new study.

“Vaccination is safe, cheap, readily available and decreases influenza infection. On top of that, our study suggests that it could also protect against fatal heart attacks and strokes and deaths from other causes,” said study first author Daniel Modin from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

The study used Danish nationwide healthcare registers to identify 608,452 patients aged 18 to 100 years with hypertension during nine consecutive influenza seasons (2007-2016).

The researchers followed patients over each season and tracked how many died.

In particular, they recorded death from all causes such as cardiovascular, heart attack or stroke.

Finally, they analysed the association between receiving a vaccine before flu season and the risk of death during flu season.

Transdermal, Optical Imaging, Blood Pressure
Influenza vaccination in patients with high blood pressure is associated with 18 per cent reduced risk of death during the flu season. Pixabay

The analysis controlled for patient characteristics that could impact the likelihood of dying such as age, comorbidities, medications, and socioeconomic status.

After adjusting for patient differences, in a given influenza season, vaccination was associated with 18 per cent relative reduction in the risk of dying from all causes, 16 per cent relative reduction in the risk of dying from any cardiovascular cause, and 10 per cent from a heart attack or stroke.

ALSO READ: Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The study shows that influenza vaccination may improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with hypertension.

Regarding how flu and cardiovascular disease might be connected, the researchers noted that when the influenza virus infects the body, it triggers a strong immune reaction and subsequent inflammation.

These responses fight the infection and clear the virus from the body. (IANS)

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People with Inadequate Food Access Likely to Die Prematurely: Study

Inadequate food access linked to premature mortality

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Dying Prematurely
People with inadequate access to food due to financial constraints are more likely to die prematurely. Pixabay

Researchers have found a latest health news that people with inadequate access to food due to financial constraints are 10 to 37 per cent more likely to die prematurely from any cause other than cancer, compared to food-secure people.

“Among adults who died prematurely, those experiencing severe food insecurity died at an age nine years earlier than their food-secure counterparts,” said study lead author Fei Men from the University of Toronto in Canada.

For the study, published in the journal CMAJ, researchers looked at data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2005-2017 on more than half a million adults in Canada.

They categorised people as food secure, or marginally, moderately or severely food insecure.

Dying Prematurely food
Among adults who died prematurely, those experiencing severe food insecurity died at an age nine years earlier than their food-secure counterparts. Pixabay

By the end of the study period, 25 460 people had died prematurely, with people who were severely food insecure dying nine years younger than their food-secure counterparts (59.5 years old versus 68.9 years).

Previous studies have examined the relation between inadequate food and death, although none looked at causes of death.

The average life expectancy in Canada in 2008-2014 was 82 years; deaths at or before that age were considered premature in this study.

Severely food-insecure adults were more likely to die prematurely than their food-secure counterparts for all causes except cancers, the study said.

Also Read- Video Games May Have Positive Impact on Kids: 71% Parents

Premature death by infectious-parasitic diseases, unintentional injuries and suicides was more than twice as likely for those experiencing severe versus no food insecurity, it added.

“The significant correlations of all levels of food insecurity with potentially avoidable deaths imply that food-insecure adults benefit less from public health efforts to prevent and treat diseases and injuries than their food-secure counterparts,” the researchers said. (IANS)