Tuesday September 25, 2018

Foetal Immune Rejection Could be the Reason of Preterm Labor

For the new study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team tested umbilical cord blood, which contains foetal cells, along with blood taken from nearly 200 women who had healthy pregnancies and those who went into early labour.

0
//
31
pregnant, cesarean
However, when it comes to vaginal delivery, the first thought that crosses most womens' minds is of the labour pain which develops a fear of the VBAC, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Foetal immune rejection may be one of the causes for preterm labour — a common pregnancy complication leading to birth occurring before the 37th week of pregnancy, researchers say.

The findings showed that it may sometimes happen when the foetal immune system “wakes up” too early and begins to reject the mother, causing the uterus to start contracting.

The researchers think the foetal immune system becomes triggered in a case of mistaken identity.

The findings showed that it may sometimes happen when the foetal immune system "wakes up" too early and begins to reject the mother, causing the uterus to start contracting.
Representational Image, pexels

An initial infection in the mother can result in inflammation and arouse the foetal immune system. The foetal immune cells confuse the mother’s cells for an invader and mount an attack, in the form of inflammatory chemicals.

These chemicals then trigger contractions, leading to preterm labour, the leading cause of infant mortality, the researchers explained.

“The dogma has always been that the foetus has a very immature immune system, and as a result, people haven’t really considered its possible role in pregnancy complications,” said Tippi MacKenzie, Associate Professor at the University of California-San Francisco.

“We showed that in patients who have preterm labour as a result of some kind of infection or inflammation — the most common cause of preterm labour — the foetal immune system awakens prematurely and may trigger labour,” MacKenzie added.

For the new study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team tested umbilical cord blood, which contains foetal cells, along with blood taken from nearly 200 women who had healthy pregnancies and those who went into early labour.

Also Read: Using aspirin may reduce obesity’s effect on cancer, finds study 

While the scientists saw no signs of an immune response in the mother’s blood, they instead, detected activation in two types of immune cells — T-cells and dendritic cells — in the cord blood of preterm infants.

The researchers also found greater numbers of the mother’s cells circulating in the cord blood of preterm infants. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Novel Blood Test May Predict Autism Risk in Babies During Pregnancy

These are exciting results as they hint at differences in some metabolic processes that potentially play a role in increasing the risk of having a child with autism

0
Pregnancy, autism
New blood test in pregnancy to predict autism risk in babies. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a novel blood test for pregnant mothers that can, with nearly 90 per cent accuracy rate, predict the probability of having a child that will be diagnosed with autism.

According to studies, if a mother has previously had a child with autism, the risk of having a second child with the developmental disorder is approximately 18.7 per cent, whereas the risk in the general population is approximately 1.7 per cent.

In the study, led by Juergen Hahn, Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, metabolites of the folate-dependent transmethylation and transsulfuration biochemical pathways of pregnant mothers were measured to determine whether or not the risk of having a child with autism could be predicted by her metabolic profile.

Pregnant mothers who have had a child with autism before were separated into two groups based on the diagnosis of their child whether the child had autism or not.

Pregnancy
Representational image. Pixabay

Then these mothers were compared to a group of control mothers who have not had a child with autism before.

The results, appearing in the journal Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, showed that while it is not possible to determine during a pregnancy if a child will be diagnosed with autism by age 3, they did find that differences in the plasma metabolites are indicative of the relative risk (18.7 per cent vs 1.7 per cent) for having a child with autism.

Also Read About- Twitter Gets a Bug And Releases DM’s of 3 Mn Users To a Third Party Application

“These are exciting results as they hint at differences in some metabolic processes that potentially play a role in increasing the risk of having a child with autism,” Hahn said.

“However, it would be highly desirable if a prediction based upon physiological measurements could be made to determine which risk group a prospective mother falls into,” Hahn noted. (IANS)

Next Story