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Following its own culture and language will make India a powerful nation: Koenraad Elst

The only way India can be a powerful nation of the 21st century is to follow her own culture and language and not be an Anglo-Indian, says Dr. Elst

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Dr. Koenraad Elst

By Arnab Mitra

New Delhi, Feb 6,2016: “The only way India can be a powerful nation of the 21st century is to follow her own culture and not be an Anglo-Indian”, said Belgium philosopher Dr Koenraad Elst in a seminar titled ‘Vedic Religion and Buddhism’ organized by Wider Association for Vedic Studies (WAVES) and Human Advancement Institute in New Delhi on Saturday.

Elst referring to countries like Russia, China, France and Japan, said India must also follow its own culture to become a powerful nation.

He said, “language and culture is like a mother of any race and she cannot be compared with the mother-in-law, so the the original culture cannot be substituted with a foreign one. Indians will have the subservient attitude if the system remains same.”

He recalled that before Muslim rulers invaded India it was propagated that “Hinduism is the problem and Buddhism is the solution”. However, he further noted that with Islamic rulers, Islam took the place of Buddhism.

But the true story is Hinduism is much a large concept, claimed Elst, adding that there was a time when every tribe and pagan Indian was considered a Hindu. Even at the initial level the Buddhists were Hindus, he mentioned.

So Indians, by definition are Hindus and the Sikhs, Buddhists and any other religion in India have originated from Hinduism except Islam and Christianity, said Elst.

“In India, every language whether it is Bengali or Oria, all originated from Vedic Sanskrit and it is a very vague concept that vernacular language cannot be implemented in a diverse country like India which has a plethora of cultures,” said the philosopher.

The dialect changes with every 10 kms in most big countries but only in India it is noted that the culture and language take a backseat when they are replaced, he regretted.

 

  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Compulsive and strong requirement via local language is understandable to store the knowledge in the language of dreams which is a mother`s language.What stands blocked is how to transform the collective piles of English/French/Dutch in any colonial country with sources of books and admin rules in the mother tongue of several communities.Is local language really a step to become powerful or is it still a vehicle towards India`s power ? What about culture when language was missing or was not in use ? What about the misuse of Sanskrit promoters who bashed Tulisidas wanting to rewrite Ram charit manas in local language ? This good coverage remains incomplete if the full text or vedio is not published of this event missed by several including me.

  • Rangaesh Gadasalli

    Mughal rule and British rule which buried all that was good about Sanatan Bharath was the root cause for the domination and a feeling of superiority of Abrahamic religions over Dharmic religions. Even after 1947 Nehru and Congress openly allowed religious conversions of back ward class Hindus to Christianity and Islam hurting the Hindus immensely. Now for Asian religions to survive and spread the universal truth of tolerance practiced by Hindus, Sikhs Jains and Buddists is to UNITE against assaults by Abrahamic religions, particularly Vatican which has billions and thousands of NGOs to influence against Sanathan dharams. Look at the way Amnesty international, a vatican supported organization taregeted the Hindus and Indian govt for human rights violations and gave a free pass to all Terrorists who attacked india and killed hundreds of people. Any atrocity on Hindus never does not get publicized in the press and TV.

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  • Rakesh Manchanda

    Compulsive and strong requirement via local language is understandable to store the knowledge in the language of dreams which is a mother`s language.What stands blocked is how to transform the collective piles of English/French/Dutch in any colonial country with sources of books and admin rules in the mother tongue of several communities.Is local language really a step to become powerful or is it still a vehicle towards India`s power ? What about culture when language was missing or was not in use ? What about the misuse of Sanskrit promoters who bashed Tulisidas wanting to rewrite Ram charit manas in local language ? This good coverage remains incomplete if the full text or vedio is not published of this event missed by several including me.

  • Rangaesh Gadasalli

    Mughal rule and British rule which buried all that was good about Sanatan Bharath was the root cause for the domination and a feeling of superiority of Abrahamic religions over Dharmic religions. Even after 1947 Nehru and Congress openly allowed religious conversions of back ward class Hindus to Christianity and Islam hurting the Hindus immensely. Now for Asian religions to survive and spread the universal truth of tolerance practiced by Hindus, Sikhs Jains and Buddists is to UNITE against assaults by Abrahamic religions, particularly Vatican which has billions and thousands of NGOs to influence against Sanathan dharams. Look at the way Amnesty international, a vatican supported organization taregeted the Hindus and Indian govt for human rights violations and gave a free pass to all Terrorists who attacked india and killed hundreds of people. Any atrocity on Hindus never does not get publicized in the press and TV.

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Whale-Watching, a Growing Business around Japan

People packed the decks of the Japanese whale-watching boat, screaming in joy as a pod of orcas put on a show

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Tourists on a whale watching tour boat look for whales in the sea near Rausu, Hokkaido, Japan, July 1, 2019. VOA

People packed the decks of the Japanese whale-watching boat, screaming in joy as a pod of orcas put on a show: splashing tails at each other, rolling over, and leaping out of the water.

In Kushiro, just 160 kilometers south of Rausu, where the four dozen people laughed and cheered, boats were setting off on Japan’s first commercial whale hunt in 31 years.

Killed that day were two minke whales, which the boats in Rausu also search for glimpses of – a situation that whale-watching boat captain Masato Hasegawa confessed had him worried.

“They won’t come into this area – it’s a national park – or there’d be big trouble,” the 57-year-old former pollock fisherman said. “And the whales we saw today, the sperm whales and orcas, aren’t things they hunt.”

Whale, Business, Japan
Whale-watching boat captain Masato Hasegawa speaks with other boats in order to look for whales in the sea near Rausu, Hokkaido, Japan, July 1, 2019. VOA

“But we also watch minkes,” he added. “If they take a lot in the (nearby) Sea of Okhotsk, we could well see a change, and that would be too bad for whale watching.”

Whale-watching is a growing business around Japan, with popular spots from the southern Okinawa islands up to Rausu, a fishing village on the island of Hokkaido, so far north that it’s closer to Russia than to Tokyo.

The number of whale watchers around Japan has more than doubled between 1998 and 2015, the latest year for which national data is available. One company in Okinawa had 18,000 customers between January and March this year.

In Rausu, 33,451 people packed tour boats last year for whale and bird watching, up 2,000 from 2017 and more than 9,000 higher than 2016. Many stay in local hotels, eat in local restaurants, and buy local products such as sea urchins and seaweed.

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“Of the tourist boat business, 65 percent is whale watching,” said Ikuyo Wakabayashi, executive director of the Shiretoko Rausu Tourism Association, who says the numbers grow substantially each year.

“You don’t just see one type of whale here, you see lots of them,” she said. “Whale-watching is a huge tourist resource for Rausu and this will continue, I hope.”

Wakabayashi was drawn to Rausu by whale-watching; a native of the western city of Osaka, she fell in love with the area after three trips there to see orcas.

“I thought this was an incredible place,” she said. “Winters are tough, but it’s so beautiful.”

Whale, Business, Japan
A heavy shroud of morning mist fills a port in Rausu, Hokkaido, Japan, July 2, 2019. VOA

Hasegawa, who says he has a waiting list of customers in high season, has ordered a second boat.

“Right now, the lifestyle we have is good,” Hasegawa said. “Better than it would have been with fishing.”

Small Industry

The five whaling vessels moored at Kushiro port on Sunday, the night before the hunt resumed, were well-used and well-maintained. Crew members came and went, carrying groceries or towels, heading for a public bath.

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Barely 300 people are directly involved with whaling around Japan, and though the government maintains whale meat is an important part of food culture, the amount consumed annually has fallen to only 0.1 percent of total meat consumption.

Yet Japan, under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe – himself from a whaling district – left the International Whaling Commission (IWC) and returned to commercial whaling on July 1.

Whaling advocates, such as Yoshifumi Kai, head of the Japan Small-type Whaling Association, celebrated the hunt.

“We endured for 31 years, but now it’s all worth it,” he said in Kushiro on Monday night after the first minkes were brought in to be butchered. “They’ll be whaling for a week here, we may have more.”

Whale, Business, Japan
A captured Minke whale is unloaded after commercial whaling at a port in Kushiro, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan, July 1, 2019, in this photo taken by Kyodo. VOA

Everybody acknowledges that rebuilding demand could be tough after decades of whale being a pricey, hard-to-find food.

Consumption was widespread after World War II, when an impoverished Japan needed cheap protein, but fell off after the early 1960s as other meat grew cheaper.

“Japan has so much to eat now that food is thrown out, so we don’t expect demand for whale will rise that fast,” said Kazuo Yamamura, president of the Japan Whaling Association.

“But looking to the future, if you don’t eat whale, you forget that it’s a food,” he said. “If you eat it in school lunches, you’ll remember that, you’ll remember that it’s good.”

Whale, Business, Japan
A killer whale swims in the sea near Rausu, Hokkaido, Japan, July 1, 2019. VOA

Pro-whaling lawmaker Kiyoshi Ejima said that subsidies were unlikely, but that the government should be careful not to let the industry founder. About 5.1 billion yen ($47.31 million) was budgeted for whaling in 2019.

“If we pull away our hands too soon, a lot of companies will fail,” he added.

The goal of selling whale throughout Japan may be impractical, said Joji Morishita, Japan’s former IWC commissioner.

“The alternative … is to just limit the supply of whale meat to some of the major places in Japan that have a good tradition of whale eating,” Morishita said, adding that the meat is difficult to thaw and cook.

In areas for which whaling is a tradition, this niche market could promote tourism, which Abe has made a pillar of his economic plan.

“Whale eating in a sense is ideal – it’s different, it’s well-known, and for better or worse, it’s very famous,” Morishita said. “Taking advantage of this IWC withdrawal, I think there are business chances that are viable.”

Whales Up Close

For Rausu, on Hokkaido’s remote Shiretoko Peninsula, the viable business is whale watching.

Foxes run through the streets of the city’s downtown, which clings to a narrow strip of land below mountains and faces the Nemuro Strait. Summer often brings thick fog, while winter storms can leave waist-high drifts.

Though fishing was long Rausu’s economic backbone, the industry has taken a hit from declining fish stocks, which locals blame on Russian trawlers and falling prices. The population has dropped by several hundred annually, slipping below 5,000 this year.

Hasegawa, a fourth-generation fisherman, began his tour boat business in 2006. Though the first few years were a struggle, he is now happy with his choice as Rausu’s reputation grows globally.

On a recent weekday, customers packed the parking lot at a wharf lined with squid-fishing boats, waiting to board Hasegawa’s boat and those of three other companies. Hasegawa’s customers came from all over Japan and several foreign countries.

“Today there were more (whale) jumps than usual; it was fantastic,” said Kiyoko Ogi, a 47-year-old Tokyo bus driver who’s been whale-watching in Rausu three times. “I’m really opposed to commercial whaling; seeing whales close is so exciting.”

Whale hunting was never big in Rausu, and though Hasegawa said there once was “trouble” with people hunting small Baird’s beaked whales nearby, those fishermen now stay far from the tours and will tell him where to find orcas and sperm whales.

But he’s dubious about whether demand for whale meat will ever pick up. Restaurants and hotels in Rausu avoid serving it.

“We get a lot of kids in summer vacations. If you tell them on the boat that ‘this is the whale we ate last night,’ they’d cry,” he said.

“If they serve whale, nobody from overseas will come, especially Europeans,” he added. “Given that the national government is trying to woo overseas tourists so much, its thinking (on whaling) seems a bit wrong.”

($1 = 107.7900 yen). (VOA)