Thursday July 18, 2019
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“Foodie Call”: Study Shows Nearly 1 in 4 Women go on a Date for Grabbing a Free Meal

New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a "foodie call"

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Study says, 1 in 4 women go on date for a free meal. Pixabay

Call it new-age dating but nearly one in four women now go on a date not for the sake of romance or building a long-term relationship but grabbing a free meal, an interesting study has revealed.The new phenomenon is a “foodie call” where a person sets up a date with someone they are not romantically interested in, for the purpose of getting a free meal.

New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a “foodie call”.

The researchers from California-based Azusa Pacific University and University of California-Merced found that women who scored high on the “dark triad” of personality traits (psychopathy, Machiavellianism, narcissism), as well as expressed traditional gender role beliefs, were most likely to engage in a “foodie call” and find it acceptable.

foodie call
The new phenomenon is a “foodie call” where a person sets up a date with someone they are not romantically interested in, for the purpose of getting a free meal. Pixabay

“Several dark traits have been linked to deceptive and exploitative behaviour in romantic relationships, such as one-night stands, faking an orgasm, or sending unsolicited sexual pictures,” said Brian Collisson from Azusa Pacific University in a paper appeared in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

In the first study, 820 women were recruited. They answered a series of questions that measured their personality traits, beliefs about gender roles, and their “foodie call” history. They were also asked if they thought a “foodie call” was socially acceptable.

Twenty-three per cent of women in this first group revealed they’d engaged in a “foodie call”. “Most did so occasionally or rarely.

foodie call
New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a “foodie call”. Pixabay

Although women who had engaged in a foodie call believed it was more acceptable, most women believed foodie calls were extremely to moderately unacceptable,” the findings showed.

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The second study analyzed a similar set of questions of 357 heterosexual women and found 33 per cent had engaged in a “foodie call”. For both groups, those engaged in “foodie calls” scored higher in the “dark triad” personality traits.

The researchers also note that “foodie calls” could occur in many types of relationships, and could be perpetrated by all genders. (IANS)

Next Story

Your Genes Determine How Successful Your Married Life Is

They are relevant to how partners provide and receive support from each other.

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They are relevant to how partners provide and receive support from each other. Pixabay

Do you think you could lead a happy married life? The answer is in your genes, a new study has said.

Although prior research has hinted that marital quality is, at least partially, impacted by genetic factors, and that oxytocin may be relevant to social support, according to recent studies, variation on specific genes related to oxytocin functioning impact overall marital quality, in part.

They are relevant to how partners provide and receive support from each other.

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Husbands with a particular genotype were less satisfied with the support they were provided from their wives which suggested that it was also associated with being less satisfied with their marriage, noted Mattson. Pixabay

The study evaluated whether different genotypes – possible genetic combinations of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR)- influenced how spouses support one another, which is a key determinant of overall marital quality.

OXTR was targeted because it is related to the regulation and release of oxytocin.

“Genes matter when it comes to the quality of marriage, because genes are relevant to who we are as individuals, and characteristics of the individual can impact the marriage,” said Richard Mattson, Associate Professor from the Binghamton University in the US.

For the study, the team included nearly 100 couples.

Each partner was asked individually to come up with an issue to discuss something they identify as their most salient personal problem that was not related to their partner or partner’s family such as problems at work.

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Genes matter when it comes to the quality of marriage, because genes are relevant to who we are as individuals, and characteristics of the individual can impact the marriage,” said Richard Mattson, Associate Professor from the Binghamton University in the US. Pixabay

“We found that variation at two particular locations on OXTR impacted the observed behaviours of both husbands and wives, and that differences in behaviour across couples had small but cumulative effects on overall evaluations of support, and thus marital quality in general,” added Mattson, published in the Journal of Family Psychology.

However, what emerged as most relevant to overall marital quality for both partners was genotypic variation among husbands at a specific location on OXTR.

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Husbands with a particular genotype were less satisfied with the support they were provided from their wives which suggested that it was also associated with being less satisfied with their marriage, noted Mattson.

The researchers hope their findings provide the foundation for replication and additional study of OXTR as an enduring determinant of marital functioning. (IANS)