Tuesday November 20, 2018

Former Nepalese King Gyanendra disappointed with country’s present situation

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Nepal: Former King Gyanendra of Nepal is not satisfied with the present situation in the country. The former king visited the Pashupatinath Temple on Monday evening.

On the occasion of Maha Shivaratri, he extended his greetings to all the Hindus in Nepal and around the world, upon a brief encounter with journalists.

The former king expressed his disappointment with Nepal’s present situation which seems to be going downhill. Political uncertainty in Nepal has made it extremely hard for its economy to grow.

Nepal’s rocky geography, scarcity of tangible natural resources accompanied by poor infrastructure are factors to its declining economy. Also, the ineffective post-1950 government and the long-running civil war are contributing factors in demolishing the nation’s economic development.

The King prayed to the Lord Pashupatinath for country’s peace and relief from the present situation.

The 2,000-year-old temple of Pashupatinath is situated on the bank of the sacred Bagmati River in Kathmandu valley. It comes under one of the most significant Hindu temples of Lord Shiva who is considered the creator of the world.

Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev was the King of Nepal from 2001 to 2008. He also briefly served as king in his childhood from 1950 to 1951. This was when his grandfather, Tribhuvan, went into exile in India with the rest of his family.

There’s a celebratory flavor to Maha Shivaratri, and maintaining the long followed tradition, he performed the 45 minutes long pooja at the Pashupatinath Temple on the festival’s occasion. (With Inputs from Agencies)

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9 Climbers Pulled From Snow After A Sudden Storm On Mount Gurja, Nepal

Mountaineering experts are questioning how the experienced team was so badly hit at their base camp at 3,500 meters.

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Mount Gurja
Tourists take pictures at Sarangkot in Pokhara, with the view of the Mount Annapurna range in the background, some 200 km (124 miles) west of Kathmandu, Nov. 30, 2008. Annapurna, at 8,091 meters high, is the 10th highest mountain in the world.. VOA

A rescue team Sunday began retrieving the bodies of nine climbers killed in a violent storm on Nepal’s Mount Gurja, a freak accident that has left the mountaineering community reeling.

A helicopter dropped four mountain guides at the camp where the South Korean climbing expedition was staying when powerful winds and snow swept through, killing the entire team and scattering their bodies as far as 500 meters (yards) away.

“All nine bodies have been found and the team are in the process of bringing them down,” said Siddartha Gurung, a chopper pilot who is coordinating the retrieval mission.

Mount Gurja
A helicopter dropped four mountain guides at the camp.

A second helicopter along with a team of rescue specialists and villagers were also involved in the mission, which has been hampered by strong winds as well as the camp’s remoteness in the Dhaulagiri mountain range of Nepal’s Annapurna region.

The bodies of the climbers, five South Koreans and four Nepalis, will be flown to Pokhara, a tourist hub that serves as a gateway to the Annapurna region, and then to Kathmandu, said Yogesh Sapkota of Simrik Air, a helicopter company involved in the effort.

‘Like a bomb went off’

The expedition’s camp was destroyed by the powerful storm, which hit the area late Thursday or Friday, flattening all the tents and leaving a tangled mess of tarpaulin and broken polls.

“Base camp looks like a bomb went off,” said Dan Richards of Global Rescue, a U.S.-based emergency assistance group that will be helping with the retrieval effort.

Mount Gurja
Wangchu Sherpa of Trekking Camp Nepal, organised the expedition

The expedition was led by experienced South Korean climber Kim Chang-ho, who has climbed the world’s 14 highest mountains without using supplemental oxygen.

Experts puzzled

Mountaineering experts are questioning how the experienced team was so badly hit at their base camp at 3,500 meters.

Also Read: Nepal Saves Its Tiger Population, Doubles It

“At this point we don’t understand how this happened. You don’t usually get those sorts of extreme winds at that altitude and base camps are normally chosen because they are safe places,” Richards said.

The team had been on 7,193-meter (23,599-foot) Mount Gurja since early October, hoping to scale the rarely climbed mountain via a new route. (VOA)