Wednesday June 19, 2019

Former Nepalese King Gyanendra disappointed with country’s present situation

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Image source: news.yahoo.com

Nepal: Former King Gyanendra of Nepal is not satisfied with the present situation in the country. The former king visited the Pashupatinath Temple on Monday evening.

On the occasion of Maha Shivaratri, he extended his greetings to all the Hindus in Nepal and around the world, upon a brief encounter with journalists.

The former king expressed his disappointment with Nepal’s present situation which seems to be going downhill. Political uncertainty in Nepal has made it extremely hard for its economy to grow.

Nepal’s rocky geography, scarcity of tangible natural resources accompanied by poor infrastructure are factors to its declining economy. Also, the ineffective post-1950 government and the long-running civil war are contributing factors in demolishing the nation’s economic development.

The King prayed to the Lord Pashupatinath for country’s peace and relief from the present situation.

The 2,000-year-old temple of Pashupatinath is situated on the bank of the sacred Bagmati River in Kathmandu valley. It comes under one of the most significant Hindu temples of Lord Shiva who is considered the creator of the world.

Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev was the King of Nepal from 2001 to 2008. He also briefly served as king in his childhood from 1950 to 1951. This was when his grandfather, Tribhuvan, went into exile in India with the rest of his family.

There’s a celebratory flavor to Maha Shivaratri, and maintaining the long followed tradition, he performed the 45 minutes long pooja at the Pashupatinath Temple on the festival’s occasion. (With Inputs from Agencies)

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Nepalese Government Concludes its Clean-up Drive on the Mount Everest with 11 Tonnes of Trash

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste

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Nepal
This photograph taken from a helicopter shows an aerial view of Mount Everest in Nepal's Solukhumbu district, some 140 kilometers (87 miles) northeast of Kathmandu, on Nov. 22, 2018. VOA

The Nepalese government on Monday concluded its clean-up drive of the Mount Everest and said it had collected nearly 11 tonnes of trash that had piled up on the peak for decades.

The clean-up initiative, the first of its kind since Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa conquered the summit 66 years ago, was launched in mid-April and involved an elite team of 12 high-altitude Sherpa climbers who spent over a month collecting the waste.

“Along with the rubbish, they also collected four dead bodies from the high camps of Mount Everest that were brought to Kathmandu last week,” Dandu Raj Ghimire, the Director-General of Nepal’s Tourism Department, told Efe news.

According to Ghimire, the clean-up campaign cost nearly 23 million rupees (some $207,000). He added that China had also launched a similar drive to clean the north side of the world’s highest mountain.

“There are big environmental concerns and criticism from the international community that Nepal has not shown seriousness to maintain the beauty of the iconic peak,” he added, while vowing that the government would continue to clear the human residues left on Mount Everest.

Ang Dorje Sherpa, the Chairman of the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC), said around seven tonnes of waste had been collected from the Everest Base Camp and the high camps.

The other four tonnes were removed from the villages of Lukla and Namche Bazar, both of which are considered the gateway to Everest.

Hundreds of foreign mountaineers spend thousands of dollars to conquer the peak every spring season, which normally begins in early April and lasts until May. As they go on the dangerous climb, they leave behind a trail of litter.

FILE – Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world, is seen in this aerial view March 25, 2008. VOA

Various stakeholders, including the Tourism Ministry, the Nepali Army, the Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Nepal Tourism Board, the Sagarmatha National Park, the SPCC and the local government have joined hands for this clean-up campaign.

In recent times, Everest has often earned the moniker of the world’s highest garbage dump.

Several tonnes of old equipment, oxygen cylinders, rubbish and human waste litter the famous mountain.

The government collects more than $3.55 million per year in revenue by issuing permits for climbers, but little had been spent so far to keep the ecosystem clean.

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In 2014, the government introduced a rule forcing each member of an expedition to bring back at least 8 kg of collected garbage, in addition to the trash they generate themselves.

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste.

The deposit is refunded only if the SPCC certifies that they have taken all their trash back down. But many commercial expeditions still end up leaving trash scattered among the gelid snow. (IANS)