Friday April 19, 2019

Formula made from Cow’s milk may reduce the risk of diabetes

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Formula made from Cow's milk may reduce the risk of diabetes
Formula made from Cow's milk may reduce the risk of diabetes. IANS

New York, Jan 3, 2018: Drinking formula made from cow’s milk may not put babies at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, the first large international trial showed.

Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin.

Previous studies have reported that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as cow’s milk proteins, may increase the risk of Type 1 diabetes in young children with genetic risk for the condition.

For the new study, the team led by University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, examined 2,159 infants from 15 countries with genetic risk for Type 1 diabetes to find out whether delaying the exposure to complex foreign proteins such as cow’s milk proteins would decrease the risk of diabetes.

After breastfeeding, infants were either weaned to a special formula (extensively hydrolysed casein formula), with the cow’s milk proteins split into small peptides (small pieces of the protein), or a regular cow’s milk-based formula with intact cow’s milk proteins.

Infants were fed the study formula for at least two months until the age of six to eight months and at the same time were given no cow’s milk proteins from any other food sources and were followed for over 10 years.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, revealed that no association was found between children fed formula with whole-milk proteins or those with the proteins broken down.

“The study puts to rest the controversy regarding the potential role of cow’s milk formula in the development of Type 1 diabetes,” said Dorothy Becker, Professor at the varsity.

The study also showed that “there is no evidence to revise the current dietary recommendations for infants at high risk for Type 1 diabetes,” Becker noted. (IANS)

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High Level Of Insulin in Infants May Rise Chances Of Brain Damage

"One of the problems facing clinicians is that it's really difficult to predict which babies will have problems after surgical treatment," said Karen Cosgrove, from the varsity.

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Spreading focal lesions are generally larger and spread outwards into areas of healthy cells, while isolated focal lesions, have a capsule around them that keeps the diseased cells separate from healthy cells. Pixabay

Babies born with abnormally high levels of insulin are at the risk of suffering permanent brain damage and life-long disability, finds a study that showed it’s possible to predict when and how the condition may affect the child in the long-term.

The generally rare condition, called congenital hyperinsulinism, can also be as common as cystic fibrosis in children born into communities where cousins marry.

So far, scientists understood that there were two main subtypes of the disease known as diffuse — affects the entire pancreas — and focal — affects just one area of the organ.

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In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated. Pixabay

In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated.

The new study, led by a team from the University of Manchester in the UK, showed that focal CHI can be further categorised into two types — spreading focal lesions and isolated focal lesions.

Spreading focal lesions are generally larger and spread outwards into areas of healthy cells, while isolated focal lesions, have a capsule around them that keeps the diseased cells separate from healthy cells.

For the study, published in the Frontiers in Endocrinology journal, the team investigated the cases of 25 infants with focal CHI to see how the two types of lesions influenced their long-term outcomes.

They found babies with spreading focal lesions suffered more severely from the disease and were diagnosed earlier. These infants were more likely to suffer brain damage, which permanently affected their development, learning and behaviour.

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The generally rare condition, called congenital hyperinsulinism, can also be as common as cystic fibrosis in children born into communities where cousins marry. Pixabay

In contrast, in infants with isolated lesions, the disease was diagnosed later and surgery to remove the lesion was less complicated.

These data help to explain why newborn babies diagnosed with the same disease may go on to have very different outcomes and could influence the way clinicians choose to manage each new case of CHI.

Also  Read:‘Model Chinese’ Parents Who Spent Their Careers As Loyal Civil Servants, Get Free of Uyghur Exile After Daughter’s Interview

“One of the problems facing clinicians is that it’s really difficult to predict which babies will have problems after surgical treatment,” said Karen Cosgrove, from the varsity.

“Our data gives some important clues that will help clinicians to know how much extra care each baby is likely to need,” Cosgrove said. (IANS)