Friday October 18, 2019

Formula made from Cow’s milk may reduce the risk of diabetes

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Formula made from Cow's milk may reduce the risk of diabetes
Formula made from Cow's milk may reduce the risk of diabetes. IANS

New York, Jan 3, 2018: Drinking formula made from cow’s milk may not put babies at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, the first large international trial showed.

Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin.

Previous studies have reported that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as cow’s milk proteins, may increase the risk of Type 1 diabetes in young children with genetic risk for the condition.

For the new study, the team led by University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, examined 2,159 infants from 15 countries with genetic risk for Type 1 diabetes to find out whether delaying the exposure to complex foreign proteins such as cow’s milk proteins would decrease the risk of diabetes.

After breastfeeding, infants were either weaned to a special formula (extensively hydrolysed casein formula), with the cow’s milk proteins split into small peptides (small pieces of the protein), or a regular cow’s milk-based formula with intact cow’s milk proteins.

Infants were fed the study formula for at least two months until the age of six to eight months and at the same time were given no cow’s milk proteins from any other food sources and were followed for over 10 years.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, revealed that no association was found between children fed formula with whole-milk proteins or those with the proteins broken down.

“The study puts to rest the controversy regarding the potential role of cow’s milk formula in the development of Type 1 diabetes,” said Dorothy Becker, Professor at the varsity.

The study also showed that “there is no evidence to revise the current dietary recommendations for infants at high risk for Type 1 diabetes,” Becker noted. (IANS)

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US Invents Oral Capsule To Remit Insulin Through Injection

US Scientists Design Oral Insulin Capsule to Treat Diabetes

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Insulin
US Scientists invent capsules to deliver Insulin Through Injections. Pixabay

Scientists in the US have designed an oral drug capsule that can carry insulin and protect it from the harsh environment in the digestive tracts.

The study published in this week’s Nature Medicine has shown that the capsule containing proteins that cannot be taken orally reaches the small intestine before breaking down to release dissoluble tiny needles, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Those needles then attach to the intestinal wall and release drug for fast uptake into the bloodstream, according to the study.

In tests in pigs, researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) showed that this capsule could load a comparable amount of insulin to that of an injection.

Treatment of Diabetes By Insulin
Treatment of Diabetes becomes easy as the new Insulin capsule can inject its contents into the wall of the Small Intestine. Pixabay

Earlier this year, they developed a blueberry-sized capsule containing a small needle made of compressed insulin. Upon reaching the stomach, the needle injects the drug into the stomach lining. In the new study, the researchers developed a capsule that could inject its contents into the wall of the small intestine.

They coated the 30-millimeter-long capsule with a polymer that can survive the acidic environment of the stomach. The capsule breaks open in the small intestine as the pH is higher, and then springs three folded arms containing patches of one-millimeter-long needles that can carry insulin, according to the study.

Insulin
The Capsules injected through Needles will Also Allow Reduce the risk of Blockage in the intestine. Pixabay

When the arms unfold open, the force of their release allows the needles to just penetrate the topmost layer of the small intestine tissue. After insertion, the needles dissolve and release the drug.

Also, the arms would break apart after the needle patches are applied to reduce the risk of blockage in the intestine.

Also Read: India Pulls off Target of Undergoing 25 per cent Reduction in Visual Impairment

“We can deliver insulin, but we see applications for many other therapeutics and possibly vaccines,” said Giovanni Traverso at MIT. (IANS)