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Fortis’ greed held body of a BPL family’s baby over Rs 3,500

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By NewsGram Staff-Writer

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Fortis, Vasant Kunj credit: www.livemint.com

Displaying an utter act of inhumanity, Fortis Hospital in Vasant Kunj held the body of a 17-day old baby over a mere due of Rs 3,500. The mournful parents of the deceased child belong to below poverty line (BPL) category. Later, the body was released after an intervention by a local MLA. He said the treatment should have been free of cost to the BPL family.

Father of the child Sandeep, who works as a driver in Vasant Kunj explained, “We had already paid Rs 20,000 as security deposit at the time of admission in the hospital. I have already lost four children and this fifth new born was suffering from a heart disease by birth.” The child was rushed to Fortis in an emergency when he stopped breathing after crying. Shortly, he was declared dead by the hospital authorities. He was under treatment at AIIMS.

Later, the hospital denied giving body to the family until they cleared the dues. Sandeep told that he somehow arranged the security deposit amount and could not afford anything more. He also explained about him being a BPL beneficiary, but the hospital denied any help. After a round of argument, Sandeep stiffly denied paying a single penny and demanded an explanation for not treating them accordingly.

Fortis Hospital in its statement scrapped all the charges saying that the body was handed over to the family well on time. They also denied levying any charges from the parents and said the treatment was done properly under BPL policies.

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Heart Attack Patients Get Safer, Faster Lab Scores That Diagnose Diseases

Within one month of the emergency department visits, 727 heart attacks or deaths in patients occurred.

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Faster, safer lab score to diagnose heart attacks developed. Pexels

Researchers have developed a simple laboratory score which is safer and faster at diagnosing patients who visit the emergency department with heart attack symptoms.

The findings, published in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), suggest that the score can also identify patients at risk of subsequent heart issues after discharge.

“We have developed a simple lab score that is superior to using cardiac troponin alone for the identification of patients at low and high risk for heart attack or death at emergency department presentation,” said co-author Peter Kavsak from the McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

“This lab score may reduce both the number of blood tests and the time spent in the emergency department for chest pain patients,” Andrew Worster, Professor at the varsity, said.

The team combined common laboratory blood tests available at several hospitals around the world to create a single laboratory score. Pixabay
The team combined common laboratory blood tests available at several hospitals around the world to create a single laboratory score. Pixabay

For the study, the team combined common laboratory blood tests available at several hospitals around the world to create a single laboratory score or clinical chemistry score, to diagnose a heart attack.

These blood tests are part of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of essential in vitro diagnostic tests for health care facilities with clinical laboratories.

The researchers validated the clinical chemistry score as a predictor of heart attacks or deaths within 30 days, using the data on 4,245 patients from emergency department studies in four countries — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany.

Within one month of the emergency department visits, 727 heart attacks or deaths in patients occurred.

blood tests are part of the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of essential in vitro diagnostic tests for health care facilities with clinical laboratories.
blood tests are part of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of essential in vitro diagnostic tests for health care facilities with clinical laboratories. Pixabay

A negative (or low-risk) clinical chemistry score at emergency department presentation missed only one of these events compared with up to 25 missed heart attacks or deaths when using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin test alone.

Also Read: Microsoft, Apollo Hospitals to use AI for Cardiac Diseases

A positive (or high-risk) clinical chemistry score also identified about 75 per cent of the patients at high risk of heart attacks or deaths when positive compared with a low of 40 per cent detected when the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin test alone was positive.

The researchers suggest the score can be useful for standardising diagnoses and improving safety. (IANS)

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