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France's President Emmanuel Macron appears on a screen at the Malmo International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism, in Malmo, Sweden, October 13, 2021 Credit: voa

MALMÖ, SWEDEN — Social media giants were urged to act Wednesday to stem online antisemitism during an international conference in Sweden focused on the growing amount of hatred published on many platforms.

The Swedish government invited social media giants TikTok, Google and Facebook along with representatives from 40 countries, the United Nations and Jewish organizations to the event designed to tackle the rising global scourge of antisemitism.


Sweden hosted the event in the southern city of Malmo, which was a hotbed of antisemitic sentiment in the early 2000s but which during World War II welcomed Danish Jews fleeing the Nazis and inmates rescued from concentration camps in 1945.

"What they see today in social media is hatred," World Jewish Congress head Ronald Lauder told the conference.

Ronald Laucher at Poland President of the World Jewish Congress Ronald Lauder speaks in Oswiecim, Poland, on January 27, 2020. Credit: vao

Google told the event, officially called the International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Anti-Semitism, that it was earmarking 5 million euros ($5.78 million) to combat antisemitism online.

"We want to stop hate speech online and ensure we have a safe digital environment for our citizens," French President Emmanuel Macron said in a prerecorded statement.

European organizations accused tech companies of "completely failing to address the issue," saying antisemitism was being repackaged and disseminated to a younger generation through platforms like Instagram and TikTok.

Antisemitic tropes are "rife across every social media platform," according to a study linked to the conference that was carried out by three nongovernmental organizations.

Hate speech remains more prolific and extreme on sites such as Parler and 4chan but is being introduced to young users on mainstream platforms, the study said.

On Instagram, where almost 70% of global users are aged 13 to 34, there are millions of results for hashtags relating to antisemitism, the research found.

On TikTok, where 69% of users are aged 16 to 24, it said a collection of three hashtags linked to antisemitism were viewed more than 25 million times in six months.

In response to the report, a Facebook spokesperson said antisemitism was "completely unacceptable" and that its policies on hate speech and Holocaust denial had been tightened.

Ninisto and Rama at Malmo Finnish President Sauli Niinisto and Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama speak during the Malmo International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism in Malmo, Sweden, October 13, 2021. Credit: voa

A TikTok spokesperson said the platform "condemns antisemitism" and would "keep strengthening our tools for fighting antisemitic content."

According to the EU's Fundamental Rights Agency, 9 out of 10 Jews in the EU say antisemitism has risen in their country and 38% have considered emigrating because they no longer feel safe.

"Antisemitism takes the shape of extreme hatred on social networks," said Ann Katina, the head of the Jewish Community of Malmo organization that runs two synagogues.

"It hasn't just moved there, it has grown bigger there," she told AFP.

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven has made the fight against antisemitism one of his last big initiatives before leaving office next month and has vowed better protection for Sweden's 15,000-20,000 Jews.

Reports of antisemitic crimes in the Scandinavian country rose by more than 50% between 2016 and 2018, from 182 to 278, according to the latest statistics available from the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention.

The Jewish community in Malmo has fluctuated over the years, from more than 2,000 in 1970 to just more than 600 now.

In the early 2000s, antisemitic attacks in Malmo made global headlines. Incidents included verbal insults, assaults and Molotov cocktails thrown at the synagogue.

In response, authorities vowed to boost police resources and increase funding to protect congregations under threat.

Mirjam Katzin, who coordinates antisemitism efforts in Malmo schools, the only such position in Sweden, said there was "general concern" among Jews in the city.

"Some never experience any abuse, while others will hear the word 'Jew' used as an insult, jokes about Hitler or the Holocaust or various conspiracy theories," she said. (VOA/RN)

Keywords: Antisemitism, Holocaust, Jews, World


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