Thursday September 20, 2018

Four hacks for women’s wellness

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Yoga
Yoga is known to be the ultimate healer for the soul and body. Pixabay
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  • For most women, wellness takes a back seat
  • It is very important for women to take care of health
  • There are very simple things they can do to take care of themselves

Wellness takes a backseat for most women, what with a hectic schedule taking care of work, home, and all the people in their lives. This Women’s Day, encourage the women in your life to make themselves a priority and practice these simple wellness tips to improve their overall well-being.

It is  very important for women to take care of themselves. Instagram
It is very important for women to take care of themselves. Instagram

Dr Hariprasad, Ayurveda Expert, The Himalaya Drug Company, recommends the following tips to help women become healthier without having to take too much time out of their busy schedule.

Get enough sleep: The function of sleep is to not only relax the body, but also rest and restore the mind. It is necessary to heal and repair your heart and blood vessels. While you can function for a while without getting the necessary amount of sleep every day, it will eventually take a toll on you. Commit to sleeping a minimum of seven hours a day while aiming for eight, and you will feel yourself getting healthier and happier in a short amount of time. This will help you achieve both mental and physical wellness, and your mind and body will be at ease.

Also Read: It is very important for women to take care of themselves. Instagram

Keep up energy levels: Use an energy booster like chyavanaprasha for that extra push you need to achieve your daily goals. Chyavanaprasha, which has amalaki (Indian gooseberry), gives that supplementary dose of antioxidants, in addition to boosting your energy levels. Along with this, try quick exercises like stretching and jogging to keep those endorphins flowing.

Practice preventive care: Long-term wellness is a better approach than seeking short-term solutions for the problem at hand. Having Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) can help you practice preventive care by building your immunity. According to Ayurveda texts and modern research, Guduchi increases immunity against infections by increasing the effectiveness of disease-fighting white blood cells. These fight infections and influence various other immune effector cells, ensuring early recovery. Including Guduchi in your daily diet will help increase the body’s resistance to stress and illness. It can help reduce the chances of facing health problems altogether, rather than simply resorting to curative measures when it arises.

yoga asanas
Women wellbeing is often ignored. Pixabay

Set aside some me-time: Take some time out for yourself during the day to just breathe and reflect on your day. You can do this in a structured manner using yoga and meditation techniques, but the important part is to consistently carve time out from your day for yourself. Setting aside even 10 minutes will help you relax and feel more in control of your day. You will feel the frustrations of your day melt away, leaving you to face the rest of the day with a calmer mind and a more positive outlook. IANS

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Zimbabwe Government Aid in The Cholera Outbreak By Pledging Money

In 2008 and 2009, a cholera epidemic killed nearly 5,000 people.

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Zimbabwe, Cholera
Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa talks to one of the cholera victims on Sept. 19, 2018 in Glen View’s Harare, epicenter of the waterborne disease. VOA

Zimbabwe’s president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, says his government will assist municipalities struggling to fight a cholera outbreak that has killed 32 people and affected more than 3,000 during the past three weeks.

After visiting the epicenter of the cholera outbreak in Harare, President Emmerson Mnangagwa vowed to help the Harare City Council with financial assistance and called on the corporate world to donate toward fighting the epidemic.

“We are raising money, which has been coming in daily, so that we fix the burst pipes at Morton Jeffery Waterworks and the Central Business District, as well as the suburbs… we have been told that most of these pipes are old and are bursting at any given time, so we have found some well-wishers who are helping us. We will continue to support the Harare City Council In its programs meant to sanitize Harare, because the council does not have enough powers to be doing all the work alone,” he said.

Zimbabwe Cholera
On Sept. 16, 2018, a vegetable vendor in Harare says she refuses to leave her business as she has no other sources of income with Zimbabwe’s unemployment rate said to be around 85 percent. VOA

Nearby, David Shonhiwa, a vendor in Glen View, the suburban epicenter of Harare’s cholera epidemic, says there have been improvements in the area’s hygiene since cholera was detected, but more are needed.

“The situation is better now. We have been receiving clean water and we got buckets, but it has not been possible for everyone to get something because there are difficulties which others have been encountering,” he said.

Zimbabwe Cholera
Sirak Gebrehiwot, United Nations spokesperson in Zimbabwe, says his organization has deployed three emergency situations specialists to access the situation. VOA

 

Tuesday, a U.N. spokesperson in Zimbabwe, Sirak Gebrehiwot, said a U.N. emergency response fund may be activated as the cholera outbreak spreads to other parts of the country.

“In light of the appeal announced by the government of Zimbabwe to respond to the cholera, the U.N. has scaled up its support,” said Gebrehiwot. “The regional office of the U.N. Humanitarian Affairs has already deployed three U.N. emergency humanitarian specialists in the ongoing response. This is in addition to our colleagues from UNICEF and the WHO, are already engaged on the ground in this emergency response.”

Also Read: Video- Zimbabwe’s Newly Appointed President Calls For Unity

In 2008 and 2009, a cholera epidemic killed nearly 5,000 people. It only stopped after international organizations such as USAID, Doctors Without Borders, the Red Cross and U.N. agencies including UNICEF and the World Health Organization provided medicine and water treatment chemicals. (VOA)