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Foxconn to Begin Mass Production of iPhones in India

Apple is slowly but steadily strategising its plans to make deeper inroads in a country where over 450 million people use smartphones, and assembling iPhone 7 is another step towards gaining ground

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Apple

In a clear signal that India is Apple’s next growth market, Taiwanese smartphone manufacturer Foxconn’s Chairman Terry Gou said, here on Monday, the company would begin mass production of iPhones in India this year.

Addressing an event, Gou said the move “will get Foxconn more deeply involved in the development of the country’s smartphone industry”, reports Patently Apple. “In the future, we will play an important role in India’s smartphone industry,” Gou said.

The 69-year-old billionaire founder and Chairman of Foxconn Technology Group also revealed plans to retire, signalling handing over of the baton to young management that would run the world’s largest electronics contract manufacturer.

Foxconn is already expanding its manufacturing operations in India, especially at its Sriperumbudur (Chennai) facility.

“To start with, it makes sense for Apple to localise assembling of models that have the potential to scale up and then slowly expand it to entire portfolio,” Tarun Pathak, Associate Director at Hong Kong-based Counterpoint Research, told IANS.

A CNBC report in December said Apple would begin assembling its top-end iPhones in India through the local unit of Foxconn as early as 2019.

Apple, iPhone XR
Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks about the new Apple iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max and the iPhone XR at the Steve Jobs Theater during an event to announce new Apple products, Sept. 12, 2018, in Cupertino, Calif. (VOA)

“Importantly, Foxconn will be assembling the most expensive models, such as devices in the flagship iPhone X family, potentially taking Apple’s business in India to a new level,” reported CNBC.

Giving an impetus to its India manufacturing plans, Apple in March started the assembling of iPhone 7 at its other supplier Wistron’s facility in Bengaluru. Taiwanese industrial major Wistron assembles iPhone 6S in the country.

Wistron has also announced plans to invest Rs 3,000 crore in the Narasupra industrial sector in Karnataka’s Kolar district. The new Wistron facility may also manufacture a wider range of Apple devices.

Also Read- You Can Feel Better After Paying for an Online Service to Buy a Few Moments of Flattery in China

Apple is slowly but steadily strategising its plans to make deeper inroads in a country where over 450 million people use smartphones, and assembling iPhone 7 is another step towards gaining ground.

Apple has begun reducing price of iPhones in China and may go the same way in India where the iPhone is considered expensive. It is also seeking tax relief and other incentives to begin assembling more handsets and open its branded stores in India. (IANS)

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Hackers Target 1 Indian Firm Over 1,500 Times a Week

Misconfiguration of cloud resources is still the number one cause for Cloud attacks, but now we also witness an increasing number of attacks aimed directly at Cloud service providers

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Bharat Bhise HNA, Hacker, Business
Hackers have the power to bring down your website or your entire network if they so wish. Pixabay

A single organisation in India was attacked an alarming 1,565 times per week on average in the past six months, compared to 474 attacks by hackers per organisation globally, says a new report.

According to researchers at Israeli cybersecurity firm Check Point Research, 93 per cent of malicious files in India were delivered via the web, compared to 35 per cent of malicious files globally.

The most common vulnerability exploit type in India is information disclosure, impacting 64 per cent of the organisations and the top malware in India is “XMRig” that impacts 17 per cent of firms, said Check Point’s ‘2020 Cyber Security’ report.

“2019 presented a complex threat landscape where nation states, cybercrime organisations and private contractors accelerated the cyber arms race, elevating each other’s capabilities at an alarming pace, and this will continue into 2020,” said Lotem Finkelsteen, Threat Intelligence Group Manager, Check Point Software Technologies.

It is pertinent to note that cryptominers still dominate malware landscape.

Even though cryptomining declined during 2019, linked to cryptocurrencies’ fall in value and the closure of the Coinhive operation in March, 38 per cent of companies globally were impacted by crypto-miners in 2019, up from 37 per cent in 2018.

This is because the use of crypto-miners remains a low-risk, high-reward activity for criminals.

“Detecting and automatically blocking the attack at an early stage can prevent damage. Check Point’s 2020 Security Report shares what organisations need to look out for, and how they can win the war against cyber attacks through key best practices,” Finkelsteen added.

Twenty eight per cent of organisations globally were hit by botnet activity, an increase of over 50 per cent compared with 2018.

Iranian, Hackers, Cyberattacks
FILE – In 2010, the Stuxnet virus disrupted operation of centrifuges at a uranium enrichment facility in Iran. VOA

Emotet was the most common bot malware used, primarily because of its versatility in enabling malware and spam distribution services. Other botnet actions such as sextortion email activity and DDoS attacks also rose sharply in 2019.

While the number of impacted organisations is relatively low, the severity of the attack is much higher — as seen in 2019’s damaging attacks against US city administrations.

Criminals are choosing their ransomware targets carefully, with the aim of extorting the maximum revenue possible.

Notably, 27 per cent of organisations worldwide were impacted by cyberattacks that involved mobile devices in 2019, down from 33 per cent in 2018.

While the mobile threat landscape is maturing, organisations are also increasingly aware of the threat, and are deploying more protection on mobiles.

Currently, more than 90 per cent of enterprises use Cloud services and yet 67 per cent of security teams complain about the lack of visibility into their Cloud infrastructure, security, and compliance.

The magnitude of Cloud attacks and breaches has continued to grow in 2019.

Also Read: 84% Indians Hope to Retain Their Jobs Despite Automation: WEF

Misconfiguration of cloud resources is still the number one cause for Cloud attacks, but now we also witness an increasing number of attacks aimed directly at Cloud service providers.

“Even if an organisation is equipped with the most comprehensive, state-of-the-art security products, the risk of being breached cannot be completely eliminated. Beyond detection and remediation, organizations need to adopt a proactive plan to stay ahead of cybercriminals and prevent attacks,” explained Finkelsteen. (IANS)