Thursday January 24, 2019
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Frog Poaching has become rampant in Monsoon to meet tourists’ demand in Goa

The food markets in Panaji and Margao are oblivious to the fact that poaching of frogs is illegal under the Wildlife Protection Act

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  • Frog meat is considered a common delicacy in Goa
  • Wide scale poaching continues even though frogs are protected under Wildlife Conservation Act
  • Poachers use ‘Mountain Chicken’ as code word for frogs while smuggling

People in Goa claim they have been feeding on frog meat since old ages as tradition to their culture. Frog meat is also common among the tourists who frequent Goa, especially the Russians and Spaniards. With a spurring demand for frogs which is only heightened during the months of monsoon, environment officials are citing growing concern regarding food chains.

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frog meat
Tourists in Goa, Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Ajay Saxena, Goa’s Principal Chief Conservator of Forests, calls this practice unnatural. “People in Goa claim that eating frog meat is a tradition. I don’t understand what kind of tradition is there when you are disturbing an food chain,” he said in his speech in Panaji on the occasion of World Environment Day, June 5.

Poaching of frogs is illegal under the Wildlife Protection Act. But even with legal protection being provided for the frogs, it is of little help since poachers have become adept at what they do. Bringing in frog meat from the district of Uttar Kannada, these poachers are posing a dangerous threat to the stability of ecosystems. Frog meat is often referred to as ‘Mountain Chicken’ or ‘Jumping Chicken’, which serve as code words for its cross border smuggling.

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The food markets in Panaji and Margao, however, seem to be oblivious to this fact. This is because poachers often bypass the markets and serve directly hotels and restaurants, and are paid by the size of the frogs.

Poaching, smuggling and trade of wildlife accounts to over $290 billion all over the world, only next to drug smuggling.

Meanwhile, environmentalists have another concern. With numbers of frogs drastically reducing, snakes and pythons, which are their main predators, may soon start penetrating into human settlements in search of food.

-Written by Saurabh Bodas. Saurabh is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: saurabhbodas96

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  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    This might disturb the ecosystem as well. Reduction in frog population might increase the number of snakes in the area. Moreover, it is illegal. The government would have to take strict actions for the implementation of this ban.

  • Paras Vashisth

    Poaching of frogs is illegal. The continue declination of frogs disturbing the food chain and as a result it might effect the life of other wild animals like reptiles.
    SAVE THE FROGS!!

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Yes! this will affect the ecosystem. The ecosystem works on each other’s existence. Disturbing even the finest element could affect the environment. This should be stopped and looked after.

SHARE
  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    This might disturb the ecosystem as well. Reduction in frog population might increase the number of snakes in the area. Moreover, it is illegal. The government would have to take strict actions for the implementation of this ban.

  • Paras Vashisth

    Poaching of frogs is illegal. The continue declination of frogs disturbing the food chain and as a result it might effect the life of other wild animals like reptiles.
    SAVE THE FROGS!!

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Yes! this will affect the ecosystem. The ecosystem works on each other’s existence. Disturbing even the finest element could affect the environment. This should be stopped and looked after.

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New Technology That Can Clean Water Twice As of Now

more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world's population will be living in water-stressed areas.

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Novel technology cleans water using bacteria

Researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have developed a new technology that can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes, an advance that brings hope for countries like India where clean drinking water is a big issue.

According to a team from the Washington University in St. Louis, more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas.

The team led by Srikanth Singamaneni, Professor at the varsity, developed an ultrafiltration membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose that they found to be highly efficient, long-lasting and environment-friendly.

The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling, or build up of bacteria and other harmful micro-organisms that reduce the flow of water.

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The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling. VOA

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, they used bacteria to build such filtering membranes.

The Gluconacetobacter hansenii bacteria is a sugary substance that forms cellulose nanofibres when in water.

The team then incorporated graphene oxide (GO) flakes into the bacterial nanocellulose while it was growing, essentially trapping GO in the membrane to make it stable and durable.

They exposed the membrane to E. coli bacteria, then shone light on the membrane’s surface.

After being irradiated with light for just three minutes, the E. coli bacteria died. The team determined that the membrane quickly heated to above the 70 degrees Celsius required to deteriorate the cell walls of E. coli bacteria.

While the bacteria are killed, the researchers had a pristine membrane with a high quality of nanocellulose fibres that was able to filter water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes under a high operating pressure.

When they did the same experiment on a membrane made from bacterial nanocellulose without the reduced GO, the E. coli bacteria stayed alive.

The new technology is capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, as a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates. Pixabay

While the researchers acknowledge that implementing this process in conventional reverse osmosis systems is taxing, they propose a spiral-wound module system, similar to a roll of towels.
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It could be equipped with LEDs or a type of nanogenerator that harnesses mechanical energy from the fluid flow to produce light and heat, which would reduce the overall cost.

If the technique were to be scaled up to a large size, it could benefit many developing countries where clean water is scarce, the researchers noted. (IANS)