Monday April 22, 2019
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Frog Poaching has become rampant in Monsoon to meet tourists’ demand in Goa

The food markets in Panaji and Margao are oblivious to the fact that poaching of frogs is illegal under the Wildlife Protection Act

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  • Frog meat is considered a common delicacy in Goa
  • Wide scale poaching continues even though frogs are protected under Wildlife Conservation Act
  • Poachers use ‘Mountain Chicken’ as code word for frogs while smuggling

People in Goa claim they have been feeding on frog meat since old ages as tradition to their culture. Frog meat is also common among the tourists who frequent Goa, especially the Russians and Spaniards. With a spurring demand for frogs which is only heightened during the months of monsoon, environment officials are citing growing concern regarding food chains.

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frog meat
Tourists in Goa, Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Ajay Saxena, Goa’s Principal Chief Conservator of Forests, calls this practice unnatural. “People in Goa claim that eating frog meat is a tradition. I don’t understand what kind of tradition is there when you are disturbing an food chain,” he said in his speech in Panaji on the occasion of World Environment Day, June 5.

Poaching of frogs is illegal under the Wildlife Protection Act. But even with legal protection being provided for the frogs, it is of little help since poachers have become adept at what they do. Bringing in frog meat from the district of Uttar Kannada, these poachers are posing a dangerous threat to the stability of ecosystems. Frog meat is often referred to as ‘Mountain Chicken’ or ‘Jumping Chicken’, which serve as code words for its cross border smuggling.

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The food markets in Panaji and Margao, however, seem to be oblivious to this fact. This is because poachers often bypass the markets and serve directly hotels and restaurants, and are paid by the size of the frogs.

Poaching, smuggling and trade of wildlife accounts to over $290 billion all over the world, only next to drug smuggling.

Meanwhile, environmentalists have another concern. With numbers of frogs drastically reducing, snakes and pythons, which are their main predators, may soon start penetrating into human settlements in search of food.

-Written by Saurabh Bodas. Saurabh is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: saurabhbodas96

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  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    This might disturb the ecosystem as well. Reduction in frog population might increase the number of snakes in the area. Moreover, it is illegal. The government would have to take strict actions for the implementation of this ban.

  • Paras Vashisth

    Poaching of frogs is illegal. The continue declination of frogs disturbing the food chain and as a result it might effect the life of other wild animals like reptiles.
    SAVE THE FROGS!!

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Yes! this will affect the ecosystem. The ecosystem works on each other’s existence. Disturbing even the finest element could affect the environment. This should be stopped and looked after.

SHARE
  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    This might disturb the ecosystem as well. Reduction in frog population might increase the number of snakes in the area. Moreover, it is illegal. The government would have to take strict actions for the implementation of this ban.

  • Paras Vashisth

    Poaching of frogs is illegal. The continue declination of frogs disturbing the food chain and as a result it might effect the life of other wild animals like reptiles.
    SAVE THE FROGS!!

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Yes! this will affect the ecosystem. The ecosystem works on each other’s existence. Disturbing even the finest element could affect the environment. This should be stopped and looked after.

Next Story

Experts Claim, Climate Change Can Affect Food, Water Security

Lauding IIT-Mandi for hosting the workshop, Rajeevan said the Himalayas were one of the world's sensitive hotspots to climate change along with the Artic region.

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climate
Ramesh P. Singh, workshop Coordinator and visiting faculty at IIT-Mandi, said: "We have to understand climate change and its impact as it is very important for the future generations." Pixabay

Climate change can affect the food, water and energy security of a region, Ministry of Earth Sciences Secretary M. Rajeevan said here on Friday.

“Climate is changing and global warming is happening due to the release of greenhouse gases. In many parts of the world, including India, the effects of climate change are being seen especially in mountain regions like Mandi,” he said.

He was speaking at the Indian Institute of Technology-Mandi that hosted an International Workshop on Climate Change and Extreme Events in the Indian Himalayan Region.

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In many parts of the world, including India, the effects of climate change are being seen especially in mountain regions like Mandi,” he said. Pixabay

The workshop was aimed at understanding the effects of climate change, melting of glaciers, increased frequency of extreme events, atmospheric pollution and pollution due to the burning of crop residue in the Himalayan region and applications of remote sensing.

Lauding IIT-Mandi for hosting the workshop, Rajeevan said the Himalayas were one of the world’s sensitive hotspots to climate change along with the Artic region.

“The Himalayan region is experiencing increasing variability in weather in the last many years. This could lead to further snow accumulation over this region and more research is needed to understand this phenomenon. By studying data, there is also evidence that the number of extreme warm days and nights has increased in this Himalayan region, which are clear effects of global warming.”

ocean
The workshop was aimed at understanding the effects of climate change, melting of glaciers, increased frequency of extreme events, atmospheric pollution and pollution due to the burning of crop residue in the Himalayan region and applications of remote sensing. Pixabay

In his presidential address, IIT-Mandi Director Timothy A. Gonsalves said: “We have 15 professors from six different disciplines in IIT-Mandi who are working on climate change. This workshop saw the participation of faculty from various disciplines and is an example of the inter-disciplinary and collaborative environment on campus.”

Also Read: Passwords on Sensitive Account Are Still Easy To Guess

Ramesh P. Singh, workshop Coordinator and visiting faculty at IIT-Mandi, said: “We have to understand climate change and its impact as it is very important for the future generations.”

The workshop has participation from all over India, besides Europe, and the US with over 90 speakers from across India. (IANS)