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From 35% to 24.5%: IITs revise qualifying marks for ST candidates

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Due to a significant number of seats reserved for Scheduled Tribe (ST) students going empty, the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) have decided to bring their cut-off scores down. On Friday, IITs revised the qualifying marks for ST category in the Joint Entrance Exam (JEE). This exam is conducted every year for admissions into the tech colleges.

Earlier, the aggregate marks for ST students was 177 (35%) out of 504 which has been reportedly brought down. Now, with the qualifying marks being reduced, students belonging to the ST category are required to score 124 (24.5%) out of 504 to qualify for admission to the IITs. Subsequently, the cut-off percentage for each subject has also been reduced to 7% from the earlier 10%.

In addition, the IITs have reduced the qualifying marks for all the categories. The minimum percentage of marks required for students in the Other Backward Classes (OBC) category is 6.30%, and for SC and ST candidates it is just 3.5%.

“There weren’t enough ST students who had qualified. Although we now have more ST students than seats, not everyone may take admission. They may not be happy with the IIT or the stream,” an official source told The Economic Times.

Since the time that the Joint Entrance Exam was made as a “two-tier” qualifying test, it is the first time that the cutoff score has been revised down to 30%. Also, students who attain the minimum qualifying marks in the aggregate cut-off list as well as the subject-wise cut-off will appear in the rank list.

“We have revised the marks based on the performance of all those who took the JEE (advanced),” said the organizing chairman of JEE 2015. The engineering colleges had announced a “higher cut-off” on June 3. The IITs will announce the rank list on June 25.

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IIT And IIS Collaborate To Develop Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment For The Indian Himalayan Region

"Being situated in the Himalayan region, IIT-Mandi is proud to be a part of this vulnerability assessment exercise and a leader in technology in this region."

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The 12 states are Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Tripura, Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim, hilly districts of West Bengal, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Jammu and Kashmir. Pixabay

The Indian Institute of Technology-Guwahati, Indian Institute of Technology-Mandi and Indian Institute of Science Bengaluru have collaborated to develop a climate change vulnerability assessment for the Indian Himalayan region using a common framework, it was announced on Thursday.

The assessment exercise is unique because for the first time all 12 Himalayan states have used a common framework resulting in the production of comparable state-level and within state, district-level vulnerability maps.

Such comparable vulnerability assessments are useful for the governments, implementers, decision makers, funding agencies and development experts to gain a common understanding on vulnerability, enabling them to assess which state is more vulnerable, what has made them vulnerable and how they might address these vulnerabilities.

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“The adaptation to climate change is a collaborative effort between appropriate use of technology, a vision that produces policies, a change at ground level and engaging the local communities.” Pixabay

The framework and the results were presented here at a national workshop on ‘Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for States and the Union Territories Using a Common Framework’ organised by IIT-Guwahati and IIT-Mandi with support from IISc Bengaluru, the Department of Science and Technology and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation.

The 12 states are Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Tripura, Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim, hilly districts of West Bengal, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Jammu and Kashmir.

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Such comparable vulnerability assessments are useful for the governments, implementers, decision makers, funding agencies and development experts to gain a common understanding on vulnerability, enabling them to assess which state is more vulnerable, what has made them vulnerable and how they might address these vulnerabilities. Pixabay

Highlighting impact of the project, Ashutosh Sharma, Secretary, Department of Science and Technology, said: “The adaptation to climate change is a collaborative effort between appropriate use of technology, a vision that produces policies, a change at ground level and engaging the local communities.”

“These vulnerability maps will play a crucial role in this effort.”

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Timothy A. Gonsalves, Director IIT-Mandi, said: “Being situated in the Himalayan region, IIT-Mandi is proud to be a part of this vulnerability assessment exercise and a leader in technology in this region.”

Deputy Head of Mission of the Swiss Embassy Tamara Mona said: “Switzerland, like India, has a long experience in facing the potential opportunities and risks. Swiss national policy for climate change adaptation has been complemented by local government strategies, based on detailed and locally anchored risks assessment, maps and preparedness, plans and actions.” (IANS)