Wednesday April 8, 2020

Higher Intake of Fruits and Dairy Products Reduces Risk of Stroke: Study

Eat fruits, yoghurt daily to reduce stroke risk

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Higher intakes of fruit, vegetables and dairy products is linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke. Pixabay

Different types of food are linked to risks of different types of stroke, say health and lifestyle researchers, adding that higher intakes of fruit, vegetables and dairy products is linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke.

For the study, published in the European Heart Journal, the researchers picked over 4,18,000 people in nine European countries and investigated ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke separately.

The study found that while higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, fibre, milk, cheese or yoghurt were each linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke, there was no significant association with a lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

Dairy products fruits
Consuming fruits, vegetables and dairy products has an effect on the body cholestrol. Pixabay

However, greater consumption of eggs was associated with a higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, but not with ischaemic stroke, the researchers said.

“Our study also highlights the importance of examining stroke subtypes separately, as the dietary associations differ for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, and is consistent with other evidence, which shows that other risk factors, such as cholesterol levels or obesity, also influence the two stroke subtypes differently,” said study first author Tammy Tong from University of Oxford in the UK.

Ischaemic stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery supplying blood to the brain or forms somewhere else in the body and travels to the brain where it blocks blood flow.

Haemorrhagic stroke occurs when there is bleeding in the brain that damages nearby cells. About 85 per cent of strokes are ischaemic and 15 per cent are haemorrhagic. Stroke is the second leading cause of deaths worldwide.

For the findings, the research team analysed data from 418,329 men and women in nine countries (Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK) who were recruited to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study between 1992 and 2000.

The participants completed questionnaires asking about diet, lifestyle, medical history and socio-demographic factors, and were followed up for an average of 12.7 years.

During this time, there were 4,281 cases of ischaemic stroke and 1,430 cases of haemorrhagic stroke.

Dairy products fruits
Greater consumption of dairy products is associated with a higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, but not with ischaemic stroke. Pixabay

The total amount of fibre (including fibre from fruit, vegetables, cereal, legumes, nuts and seeds) that people ate was associated with the greatest potential reduction in the risk of ischaemic stroke, the researchers said.

Every 10g more intake of fibre a day was associated with a 23 per cent lower risk, which is equivalent to around two fewer cases per 1,000 of the population over 10 years, they added.

Fruit and vegetables alone were associated with a 13 per cent lower risk for every 200g eaten a day, which is equivalent to one less case per 1,000 of the population over 10 years.

No foods were linked to a statistically significant higher risk of ischaemic stroke.

Also Read- Here’s Why You Should Include Walnuts in Your Diet

The researchers found that for every extra 20g of eggs consumed a day there was a 25 per cent higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

The researchers said the associations they found between different foods and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke might be explained partly by the effects on blood pressure and cholesterol. (IANS)

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All You Need to Know About Parkinson’s Disease

10 early signs of Parkinson's Disease

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Parkinson's disease and related disorders is common in people above 60 years of age. Pixabay

While the focus remains on the pandemic its easy to forget that there are many other illnesses which patients are struggling with.

Parkinson’s disease and related disorders is common in people above 60 years of age. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder where most tests including MRI Brain are not very helpful in diagnosis or non-contributory (except dopamine scans). So, an understanding of its clinical symptoms and signs is as vital as a diagnosis.

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Dr. Praveen Gupta, Director & HOD, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurugram shares some early signs to keep a look out for.

parkinson's disease
Parkinson disease responds very well to treatment and response may last up to more than a decade, so it is very useful to diagnose it early to restore a patient’s quality of life. Pixabay

1. A pill rolling type of tremor visible in the resting position usually in one hand which improves intruding to move the hand.

2. There is change in handwriting with the writing becoming small and cramped called micrographia.

3. There is sudden quickening of steps which the patient cannot control called shuffling; it is also accompanied by difficulty in maintaining posture.

4. There is shortening of steps leading to short stepped walk and overall time to cover a small distance increases significantly.

5. There is decreased movement of arms while walking and the arm swing is reduced, a sign of slowing.

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6. There are sleep problems with increased dreaming and enacting dreams called REM Sleep Behaviour disorder.

7. There are abnormal limb movements in sleep called PLMS and current like pain in legs called restless legs syndrome.

parkinson's disease
Parkinson’s disease is a disorder where most tests including MRI Brain are not very helpful in diagnosis or non-contributory (except dopamine scans). Pixabay

8. A gradual loss of smell and difficulty detecting or identifying doors called hyposmia during conversation

9. There is a clear lack of expression on face with significant lack of emotive expressions called mask-like face.

10. There is a forward bending of posture leading to early stooping and bending forward.

These early signs are a feature of decreased dopamine in the brain which interferes with sleep and changes in motor function leading to slowness of activities (Bradykinesia medically), stiffness of muscles (rigidity), loss of posture sense and trembling. These features usually affect one side of the body initially and respond very well to levodopa replacing treatments. There may also be some mental and behaviour changes and some patients there is an unexplained loss of weight.

Also Read- Spreading COVID-19 Awareness in Bollywood Style

If the patient walks in the clinic the physician can often start diagnosing based on these early symptoms. Tests are done to rule out other disorders mimicking Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson disease responds very well to treatment and response may last up to more than a decade, so it is very useful to diagnose it early to restore a patient’s quality of life. (IANS)